Every project is different, but you still need to tick off essential stages to make it a success. Understand the regulatory stages of a project so you know what you need to do and build it right.

The building process: an overview

All building work, including a change of use, must comply with the Building Act 2004 and the rules of the District Plan, even when building work does not require a building consent.

Owners who have not contracted out all their obligations must ensure that they apply for the following authorisations where required:

For more guidance refer to the MBIE: Do your homework(external link) section.

If you are not sure whether you need a building consent or resource consent, contact the Council on (03) 941 8999 to discuss with a Duty Building Consent Officer or Planner.


Removal of entries from certificate of title

The Building Act has provision under section 83(external link) for owners to have an existing entry (two or more allotments subject to registered entry) removed. If circumstances have changed, owners may apply for removal of entry by contacting Council’s external legal services provider Anderson Lloyd.

The Building Act has provision under section 74(3)(external link) for a building consent authority to determine an existing entry (land subject to natural hazard notification) is no longer required. If it can be determined that the entry is no longer required, owners may apply for removal of entry by contacting Council’s external legal services provider Anderson Lloyd.


Your rights and obligations

If you're going to manage a project, be aware of your responsibilities. If you're not the project manager, it still pays to know your rights and obligations in the buying and in the building process so you can protect yourself and others within the law.

For more information refer to the MBIE: Homeowner Rights and Obligations(external link) section.


Contracting your rights and obligations out

Contracting your rights and obligations out might be the right thing to do when dealing with a complex project or simply in order to keep your peace of mind during the build process.

A written contract is always a good way to ensure you and your contractor understand your rights and obligations from the start of a project, so make sure your contract spells them out. For example, your contract should include a payment schedule, a dispute resolution process and information about who does what in the building process.

Please note: you must have a written contract for residential building work with a value of $30,000 or more (including GST). However you can have a contract for any project, regardless of the cost.

For more guidance refer to the MBIE: Why contracts are valuable(external link) section.