Our community outcomes capture what we aim to achieve in promoting the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of our community.

The Local Government Act requires all local government organisations to set community outcomes.

Our community outcomes take a whole-of-community view – we can't achieve the outcomes by ourselves. It will require empowering communities and collaborating with the government and other agencies.

In 2019, the Council refreshed its community outcomes – we have 18 community outcomes under four strategic themes. 

Strong sense of community

Our general sense of wellbeing and quality of life often depends on having caring and supportive networks. Good relationships between people in the neighbourhood build a sense of belonging in the community and promote social cohesion.

What this means for our district:

  • People have a strong sense of belonging and are actively involved in the life of Ōtautahi - Christchurch.
  • Communities are supported to undertake initiatives that make their local area a better place to live and visit.
  • Vibrant and resilient community and volunteer groups provide support, encourage participation and mobilise resources.
  • People have strong social networks and someone to turn to in time of need.
  • Appropriate services are available within local communities.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Sense of community

In 2020, 69% of survey respondents agreed that it was important to feel a sense of community in their neighbourhood, although only 50% agreed that they did feel a sense of community. Although this is down from 58% who felt a sense of community in 2016, the long term trend has been stable at 54% (+-5%). Christchurch is similar to the other larger cities, which range from 45% in Wellington to 54% in Dunedin in 2020. It is possible that Covid19 has had an impact on the 2020 figures, as they are slightly lower in all centres compared with 2018.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result
 

Sense of belonging

73% of Christchurch respondents felt a sense of belonging to the wider Canterbury region. This was the same as the national average, where 73% of respondents felt a sense of belonging to their local region, and within 2% of Wellington and Auckland residents. In terms of feeling a sense of belonging to New Zealand, this was higher at 85% for Christchurch respondents. However, the national average for feeling a sense of belonging to New Zealand was 89%.
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only
 

Volunteering or unpaid work outside of home

The number of people doing unpaid work outside of their homes in Christchurch has fallen from 102,200 to 94,000 between 2006 and 2018. The majority of this was from fewer people helping to look after sick or disabled people (-2500) or children (-6300) who do not live with them. There has been a minor (2%) increase in people doing voluntary work for organisations, groups or marae over this period. Christchurch has the second lowest participation rate (14%) out of the main centres, while Wellington and Dunedin both have the highest at 17%.
Negative result 
Negative Result
 

Data sources: The big cities quality of life survey; Statistics New Zealand, General social survey 2016; Statistics New Zealand, Census of population and dwellings

 Active participation in civic life

Cities work best when residents are actively involved in shaping the city of the future.  Participation in community initiatives and wider city processes supports wellbeing.

The Council strives to give our diverse communities meaningful opportunities to have their say and contribute to decisions on issues important to them.  The Council is committed to continuing to build its governance partnership with Ngāi Tahu Papatipu Rūnanga, based on mutual understanding and respect.

What this means for our district:

    • People and organisations are listened to and valued.
    • Residents have opportunities to be involved in decisions that are important to them.
    • Community-led decision-making complements Council decision-making.
    • The Council establishes, maintains and improves opportunities for Māori to participate in decision-making.
    • Māori are involved in decision-making from the beginning, in areas of mutual interest, especially in significant decisions relating to the environment, social and economic recovery.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Local and central government voting

Voter turnout in Christchurch local government elections declined from 52% in 1992 (the first election post-1989 local government reforms) to 42% in 2019. This is a very similar trend to the average of all New Zealand city councils. There have been periods where voter turnout matched the 1992 figure, such as immediately after the September earthquakes in 2010. Voter turnout in general elections is higher and follows national trends, averaging 82% since 1999. It was 86% in 2019 (83% nationally) after steadily increasing from a low of 76% in 2011.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Confidence in decision making

Residents' confidence in the council making decisions in the best interests of the city has been declining, from 58% in 2004 to 30% in 2020. This trend has also been evident for the six cities that have consistently participated in the Quality of Life survey, except for Auckland whose residents weren't asked this question in 2020 after recording 29% in 2018. This trend was quite volatile, with an average +/-10% variation between two yearly periods. In 2020, Hamilton was the only main centre to record 40% or more.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Data sources: Department of internal affairs, Local government electoral statistics; The big cities quality of life survey.

Safe and healthy communities

The Council has wide-ranging responsibilities for keeping our communities safe and healthy in both our built and natural environment. 

Community and individual safety have many dimensions, including feeling safe from crime.  Safe communities can give people a sense of belonging and being valued.

There are also many dimensions to community and individual health and wellbeing (physical, social, spiritual, mental and emotional). 

Partnership and collaboration with government and community organisations are critical to supporting healthy people and communities.  

Local leadership at every level and strong community networks are key elements in safe communities and they are also crucial to building community resilience.

The city needs to be well prepared for natural hazards and other shocks and stressors.  Working with residents to develop planning responses that are appropriate to each community is essential for helping us prepare for future challenges.

What this means for our district:

    • Ōtautahi - Christchurch has a safe and healthy built and natural environment.
    • Council services support and enable good public health.
    • People feel safe in their homes, neighbourhoods and the central city.
    • Community facilities and public places are safe, healthy, and welcoming.
    • People have active and healthy lifestyles.
    • The city is well-prepared for future challenges.
    • Our resilient communities have a good understanding of the city’s natural hazard risks.
    • Our resilient communities help us to respond to and recover from shocks and stressors.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

People feel safe in their homes, neighbourhoods and central city

Since 2002, an average 92% of Christchurch respondents feel safe in their homes after dark, the same as the national average. 61% of people felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark in 2020 (compared with 66% in 2018); the second lowest for the main centres in 2020. Considerably more people in Dunedin (73%) and Wellington (76%) feel safe in their neighbourhoods after dark. Feelings of safety in Christchurch's central city after dark have improved from 31% in 2016 to 44% in 2020, yet remain lower than the national average of 49%.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Notifiable diseases

Campylobacteriosis was the most common notifiable disease for the Canterbury DHB area. Before 2008, there was an average of 1600 cases in Canterbury per year. Since 2008, the number of notified campylobacteriosis cases has averaged 790, except for a peak in 2012, which could be related to post-earthquake conditions. The total number of notifications for the five selected notifiable diseases averaged 1410 per year since 2012, a 15% decrease compared with pre earthquake. However notifications for Yersiniosis has doubled since the earthquakes.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Wastewater overflow events

In the year to June 2020, there were 22 overflow events, 4 due to high rainfall and 18 unrelated to the weather, such as blockages and pump station failure. Since 2015, there has been an average of six wet weather events per year and 16 dry weather events. While the wastewater network was significantly affected by the earthquakes, the average number of wet weather events is now lower than pre-earthquake average of 9 per year.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Frequency of physical activity

Since 2006, the number of days per week that people do physical activity has been declining. The proportion of those who do physical activity at least three times per week fell from 83% to 70% in 2020. The proportion of people doing no physical activity throughout the week reached 11% in 2020. However, compared with the other large cities, Christchurch people are more active except for Dunedin (71% at least 3 times per week). The average number of days of physical activity per resident has declined from 4.8 days per week in 2006 to 3.7 in 2020.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Experience of discrimination

In 2020, 11% of respondents to the Quality of Life survey had experienced discrimination in the past 3 months because of their ethnicity. This was lower than the national average of 14%. Rates were highest for those identifying as Asian and/or Indian. 12% of Christchurch respondents had experienced discrimination based on their gender, with females more likely to experience prejudice or intolerance. Around 10% of respondents had experienced discrimination because of their age, with rates highest for people aged under 25 years.
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only
 

Households prepared for emergencies

In 2019, in preparation for a natural disaster or emergency, 85% of Christchurch residents had enough food for 3 days, 75% had secured heavy household items that might fall, and 62% had 3 days of water. Fewer residents (55%) stated they had an up-to-date emergency plan. These proportions are similar to the 2018 results, except fewer people had 3 days worth of water stored in 2019, which was 70% in 2018.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Data sources: The big cities quality of life survey; Canterbury District Health Board, Notifiable disease information; Christchurch City Council, Three waters unit; Christchurch City Council, General service satisfaction survey.

Celebration of our identity through arts, culture, heritage, sport and recreation

Being able to participate in the arts, cultural or heritage activities, and/or sports and recreation are very important to individual and community wellbeing. 

Our individual and collective sense of identity and belonging is enhanced by participating in and enjoying these activities, which build connections with other people and to places.

The Council has a leadership role in making Ōtautahi - Christchurch a city where diversity is welcomed and celebrated.  The Council is also committed to a partnership relationship with Ngāi Tahu Papatipu Rūnanga which recognises that they are mana whenua for the Ōtautahi - Christchurch district. 

As mana whenua, Ngāi Tahu has the longest association with many places and resources in the district, including settlements, transport routes, gardens, urupā (burial grounds), and places of importance for mahinga kai (food and resources). 

What this means for our district:

  • Ōtautahi - Christchurch is an inclusive multicultural and multilingual city that honours Te Tiriti o Waitangi – a city where all people belong.
  • We recognise that Ngāi Tahu Papatipu Rūnanga are mana whenua for the Ōtautahi - Christchurch district.
  • We value diversity and treat all groups and cultures with respect.
  • Everyone feels welcome in the city and has a place or an activity where they can be themselves.
  • Our heritage is a taonga and should be collectively valued and protected, celebrated and shared.
  • Sites and places of cultural significance are respected and preserved.
  • Arts, cultural, sporting and recreational opportunities are available to all our communities.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Communities feel safe and welcome

In 2021, 27% of respondents to the Life in Christchurch survey agreed or strongly agreed that Christchurch is a city where all communities and people feel safe and welcome, compared to 40% in 2018. Māori respondents were the least likely to agree that the city feels safe and welcoming for all communities.
Negative result 
Negative Result
 

Participation in selected activities related to Māori culture

The 2018 Te Kupenga survey of Māori wellbeing found that participation in Māori cultural activities and practices by respondents of Māori ethnicity and/or descent was generally lower in Canterbury compared to the national average. The most common reported practice was using a Māori greeting, at 82% (90% nationally), followed by discussing or exploring whakapapa (55%, compared to 60% nationally). Around half of respondents had sang or performed a Māori song, haka or mihi and/or had worn Māori jewellery.
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only
 

Te reo Māori speakers

Around 7,800 people in Christchurch could have a conversation about a lot of everyday things in te reo Māori in 2018. This equated to 2.1% of the city's population, which was lower than the national average of 4%. Nationally and locally, the number of te reo speakers fell between 2001 and 2013. Since 2013, the number of speakers increased by 1,900 (32%) in Christchurch and 37,600 (25%) nationally. The 2018 Te Kupenga survey found that lower proportions of Māori in Canterbury could read, write, speak or understand te reo Māori than Māori nationwide.

Mixed Result
Mixed Result
 

Ability to express identity

In 2019, 79% of people in Christchurch reported it was easy or very easy to be themselves in New Zealand. Conversely, 21% of people don’t feel they can be themselves. Results for Christchurch were very similar to Selwyn and Waimakariri districts. Age and ethnicity influence feelings of personal identity with younger people and Māori, Asian and Pasifika ethnic groups reporting lower ease of being themselves.

 Positive result 
Positive Result

Diversity of Council's collections and how they represent community diversity

Around 20% of artworks in the Christchurch Art Gallery's collection are by female artists, a consistent trend over the last 20 years. Since pre-2000, artworks by Māori artists have increased from 105 to 301 in 2020 (187%), with 42 works by artists belonging to Ngāi Tahu. Artworks by Pasifika artists have increased from 10 to 44 (340%), with around half from Samoan artists. Works by New Zealand artists make up 58% of the collection (up from 52% pre-2000), while British and European artists' works have declined from 35% to 27% over the same period.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result
 

Perceptions of heritage and taonga

Just under half of respondents to the 2021 Life in Christchurch survey (47%) agreed that the city's heritage and taonga is accessible to all, slightly lower than in 2018 (49%). Around 40-42% of respondents agreed that our heritage and taonga is shared and celebrated, and includes, respects and celebrates the diversity of the city. Māori and MELAA (Middle Eastern, Latin American and African) respondents were amongst the least likely to agree with these statements (although the number of non-European ethnicity respondents is relatively low).
Negative result 
Negative Result
 

Attitudes to neighbourhood diversity

Between 80-90% of Christchurch respondents to the 2016 General Social survey would be comfortable or very comfortable having a neighbour who had a different ethnicity (87%), religion (85%), sexual preference (84%), disability (82%) or language (81%). These were all generally slightly lower than the national average. Just over half (56%) would be comfortable with a neighbour who had a mental illness, slightly higher than for all of New Zealand (53%).
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only
 

Does lifestyle and cultural diversity make the city a better place?

In 2020, 66% of respondents to the Quality of Life survey thought increasing numbers of people with different lifestyles and cultures from different countries made the city a better or much better place. This has increased overall from 52% in 2004, and was similar to the 2020 national average.
 Positive result 
Positive Result

Data sources: Christchurch City Council, Life in Christchurch survey; Statistics New Zealand, Te Kupenga 2018; Statistics New Zealand, Census of Population and Dwellings; Canterbury District Health Board, Canterbury wellbeing survey; Christchurch City Council, Christchurch Art Gallery acquisitions database; Statistics New Zealand, General Social survey 2016; The big cities quality of life survey.

Valuing the voices of all cultures and ages (including children)

The Council’s vision for the city is that Ōtautahi - Christchurch is a city of opportunity for all, open to new ideas, new people and new ways of doing things.  We want to be an inclusive, connected city. 

It is important to the Council to take an inter-generational approach to issues, prioritising the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of the community now and into the future.

What this means for our district:

  • Ōtautahi - Christchurch has resilient, inclusive communities that build positive relationships,  enhance understanding of human rights, and resist discrimination and racism.
  • All communities have equitable access to Council services and resources, and their voices are heard and valued.
  • There are tailored opportunities for diverse communities to have their say and to shape decision-making on issues they care about.
  • Barriers to participation are identified and removed, especially for under-represented communities.
  • Our children and young people have opportunities to be heard, and their views are valued.
  • The needs of current and future generations are taken into account in city decision-making.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Diversity of people standing for local governance positions

The proportion of Christchurch city councillor candidates standing for election who were women was 15% in 2019, the lowest since the time series began in 2007. This was also lower than the 2019 national average of 35% (city and district councillor candidates). Of the candidates seeking a community board member position in Christchurch, 43% were women in 2019. This was the same as the national average and similar to the previous two elections.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Diversity of elected representation

In 2019, 31% of Christchurch's elected city councillors were women. This was slightly higher than the previous two terms when around one quarter were women, but prior to the earthquakes over half of the council consisted of women. Nationally, the proportion of women councillors in 2019 was 40%. Women made up 43% of elected community board members in 2019, similar to the national average, but lower than the previous two terms when over half of members were women.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

 

Proportion of people voting in local and general elections by age and ethnicity

City-wide, 86% of enrolled voters voted in the 2020 general election. A higher proportion of people of non-Māori descent voted (86%) compared to those of Māori descent (82%). This difference in voting patterns was also apparent nationally but with a larger gap (10 percentage points difference). Voting turnout increased with age for both Māori and non-Māori, although younger Māori were less likely to vote than younger non-Māori. Of those enrolled aged under 25 years, 79% with Māori descent voted compared with 84% of non-Māori.
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only
 

Data sources: Department of Internal Affairs, Local government electoral statistics; Electoral Commission, General Election Results

Vibrant and thriving city centre

For Ōtautahi - Christchurch to thrive and prosper as a modern, sustainable, 21st-century city, it is vital that the central city is an attractive destination for people to visit, work and live. 

What this means for our district:

We have a central city which is:

  • the thriving centre of an international city.
  • a vibrant people-focused place - day and night.
  • a community with growing, liveable central city neighbourhoods.
  • a place where residents and visitors enjoy being.

How are we doing:

View our Central City progress dashboards, which cover a range of topics including population, employment, visitors, spending patterns, and perceptions of safety, amenity and community.


Sustainable suburban and rural centres

A network of strong district and neighbourhood centres provides accessible services and facilities for communities and can be focal points for local economic activity.  As places for people, they are well-designed, accessible and safe.

What this means for our district:

  • People can meet most of their regular and everyday needs nearby.
  • Our centres maintain a good mix of social and economic uses around which new businesses investment is attracted.
  • People choose to spend time in their local centres, encouraging social interaction and participation that strengthens the community identity.
  • Communities and local businesses are encouraged to take leadership in building community loyalty to what’s on offer in local centres.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Spending

Spending at Key Activity Centres grew by 42% between 2009-2018, peaking in 2016 before declining slightly. In 2020 the Covid-19 lockdown initially caused a sharp decline in spending, before increasing to a high in the year to June 2021 ($1.63B). Overall, 85% of 46 suburban centres had annual growth classified as stable or grown during this period. For a smaller set of centres tracked more recently, 80% were stable or grew. In the year to June 2021, 92% of these centres had annual growth in spending of over 5%, compared with the Covid affected 2020 year.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Vacant building frontages

In January/February 2020, 28% of suburban centres (13 out of 46 centres) had over 10% of the length of ground floor store frontage vacant. However, only 11% had more than 20% of the length of frontages vacant. This is an improvement on 2017 when 20% of centres had over 20% ground floor store frontage vacant. Length of ground floor vacancy is used rather than the number of vacant buildings as the impact on amenity is more significant at the street level.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Retail, hospitality and service employment

At February 2020 (pre-Covid19) there were 30,700 people employed in hospitality, retail, and service industries located in suburban centres. 47% of these people worked in neighbourhood centres. Since 2010 (pre-earthquakes), suburban employment in these industries has increased by 23% or 5700 employees. Since 2000, suburban centre employment has grown by 63% compared with 42% for the total city, with large format centres increasing by 175%. On average, 85% of centres have been stable or growing for each annual period since 2012.
Positive result 
Positive Result
 

Data sources: Marketview, spending data; Christchurch City Council, Groundfloor activity survey; Statistics New Zealand, Business demography.

A well connected and accessible city promoting active and public transport

Our transport system supports community wellbeing and the liveability of the city and needs to be able to adapt to do this. 

The transport system must enable participation in economic and social opportunities; protect people from harm; support economic activity and be able to transition to low carbon transport options.

Active and public transport modes benefit Ōtautahi - Christchurch through reduced congestion and energy dependence, reducing demand for new roads and parking, and enhanced health and wellbeing through increased physical activity and greater social interaction.

What this means for our district:

  • Our transport network is reliable, safe and agile – able to adapt to and accommodate technological change, plus different and changing types of transport.
  • An increased proportion of journeys are made by active, public, or shared transport.
  • Residents have equitable access to public transport and cycleways across the city.
  • Everyone can more safely move around the city.
  • C02 emissions from transport are reduced.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Public transport trips

Pre-earthquakes, bus trips increased from 9.6 million in the year to June 2000 to an average of 17.2 million in 2009 and 2010. The earthquakes significantly impacted trips, dropping to 11.2 million in 2012, before averaging 13.7 million between 2013-2019. Covid lockdown in the year to June 2020 impacted boardings (19% lower at 11 million). Without the lockdown, bus trips would have been similar to the average from 2013. Trips per resident in greater Christchurch have declined from 31 per person in 2013, to 28 per person in the year to June 2019.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Cycle trips

In the year to June 2021, 3.6 million cyclists were counted by the Council's cycle counters on major cycleways and other main cycle routes in the city. Compared with the year to June 2019 (no lockdown influence), this was a 10% increase for the counters installed in the 2016-2018 years which have at least one year of data. The majority of this increase occurred in the year to June 2020, which included the Covid19 lockdown period. Growth between the year to June 2020 and 2021 was only 2% for these counters.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Travel to work by active, public transport or shared vehicles

33,700 people in 2018 usually travelled to work by active means, public transport or as a passenger in a vehicle. This is an increase of 9% since 2006. Of these workers, 19,000 usually cycled or walked/jogged to work, compared with 17,100 in 2006; a 10% increase. Workers travelling by public transport increased by 16%, from 7300 in 2006 to 8400 in 2018. However, nationally public transport use doubled over the same period. The proportion of people using these modes in Christchurch (16.9%) is slightly lower than the national average of 17.6%.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Travel to education by active, public transport or shared vehicles

46,000 or 52% of students drove or were driven to their place of education (school, polytechnic, university etc). This is 2% higher than the national average. 42% of students walked/jogged, cycled or took public transport, 1% lower than the national average. A greater proportion of Christchurch students cycled or walked/jogged (30% compared with 24% nationally), and fewer took public transport (11% compared with 19% nationally).
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only
 

Greenhouse gas emissions from road transport

In the year to June 2020, carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) emissions from road transport sources (petrol and diesel) was 983,000 tonnes CO2-e. This was 9% lower than the previous June year due to the Covid19 impact. Since the year to June 2000, emissions have increased by 15%. Emissions from petrol have been relatively stable at around 530,000 tonnes CO2-e per year since 2000, whereas emissions from diesel have increased by 57% over the same period, and now account for 53% of emissions compared with 39% in 2000.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Serious injuries and deaths for vulnerable road users

In the 5 years to June 2020, the average annual rate of fatalities and serious injuries for vulnerable users (cyclists and pedestrians) was 12.9 per 100,000 residents. This has been declining from over 19 per 100,000 residents in the years between June 2011 to 2014. Before this, fatalities and serious injuries had increased from 15.7 per 100,000 in 2005. In the year to June 2020, 40 vulnerable road users were killed or seriously injured on Christchurch roads. 95% of these occurred on Christchurch City Council controlled roads in the city.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Data sources: Environment Canterbury, Bus patronage statistics; Christchurch City Council, Cycle counters; Statistics New Zealand, Census of Population and Dwellings; Christchurch City Council, Fuel tax data and NZTA, Vehicle kilometres travelled; NZTA, Road crash statistics.

Sufficient supply of, and access to, a range of housing

Housing is a key building block for individual and community wellbeing.  Well-designed maintained and located housing will improve social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing in the city. 

The Council recognises that access to good quality housing is a basic human right.

What this means for our district:

  • The city has a housing supply that can meet the diverse needs of current and future residents.
  • New and existing homes are secure, accessible, safe, efficient and healthy and include affordable options.
  • Well-designed homes and neighbourhoods provide a high quality of life for residents.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Housing affordability

At December 2018, 66% of renters would need to spend more than 30% of their income if they bought a first home similar to what they are living in (lower quartile). This was over 80% of renters pre-earthquakes. Since the earthquakes this has improved by 3%, while other cities have worsened. Around 30% of Christchurch renters spent more than 30% of their income on rent between 2013 and 2018. While these results have improved, they do not take into account recent increases in house prices, rents, inflation and interest rates.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Home loan affordability

At October 2021, a first time home buyer household would need to spend 22% of their income to service a mortgage. This is has increased from 17% in October 2020. Affordability is better for first time buyers than for young family buyers (27% of take home pay). At October 2021, Christchurch is the most affordable main centre in New Zealand, however these results do not take into account recent increases in house prices, rents, inflation and interest rates.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Houses with issues with damp and mould

19% of Christchurch homes were reported to have problems with damp and mould in 2020. This has improved on the last two Quality of Life surveys by 3%. The average for New Zealand's big cities was 25% in 2020. The 2018 Census records 15,200 dwellings with problems with mould and dampness in Christchurch (12%). This is better than the average for New Zealand of 17%. Auckland and Wellington are higher at 21% and 18% respectively.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Affordability of housing costs

59% of Christchurch respondents to the 2020 Quality of Life survey reported their housing costs - rent or mortgage, rates, insurance and maintenance - were affordable. This is up from 43% in 2014. However, a quarter of respondents still thought their housing costs were unaffordable. Christchurch has the highest level of reported affordability out of the 6 big cities consistently surveyed, which averaged 47% in 2020. These results do not take into account recent increases in house prices, rents, inflation and interest rates.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Range of housing types

In 2018 there were 88,000 owner-occupied dwellings (64%) and 50,500 rented dwellings (36%). The proportion of rented dwellings has increased from 32% in 2001. Dwellings with 3-4 bedrooms have made up around two thirds of all dwellings since 2001, and are overwhelmingly owner-occupied. Dwellings with 1-2 bedrooms make up 30% of dwelling stock, and have increasingly become more likely to be rented than owner-occupied.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Households in public housing

Public housing providers such as Kāinga Ora, local government or community housing providers supply housing to those households who struggle to find housing in the open market. Since 2006, these providers have contributed between 17% and 19% of the rental housing supply in Christchurch. This totalled 8250 dwellings in 2018, an increase of 2000 (31%) from 2013.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Data sources: Ministry of Housing and Urban Development, Household affordability experimental measures; Interest.co.nz, Home loan affordability report; The big cities quality of life survey and Statistics New Zealand, Census of Population and Dwellings; The big cities quality of life survey; Statistics New Zealand, Census of Population and Dwellings.

21st-century garden city we are proud to live in

Ōtautahi-Christchurch has a proud history as New Zealand’s Garden City. 

In the 21st century, we are finding new ways to express this identity, as our regeneration produces new greenspaces and we explore more sustainable approaches to city living. 

Having good access to nature and green spaces provides many benefits.  Maintaining access to gardens, parks, trees and open spaces is becoming more important as we accommodate more people and businesses in less space.

What this means for our district:

  • The community values and actively cares for our green spaces, which in turn provide many benefits to the community.
  • Opportunities for growing and gathering food, community gardening, and buying locally are available to our communities.
  • Our homes, neighbourhoods and commercial areas incorporate vegetation and open spaces.
  • People have equitable access to open and green spaces across the city and district.

 How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Christchurch is a great place to live

Christchurch residents' rating of whether the city is a great place to live increased from 64% agreeing or strongly agreeing in 2012 to 83% in 2020, an increase of 19%, which is likely to reflect the improvement due to the earthquake rebuild. This compares with the average for the 6 big cities, which increased by 6% to 82% over the same period. Christchurch residents have the second-lowest city satisfaction out of the main cities, slightly ahead of Auckland, but 7% lower than Wellington (90%) and 4% below Hamilton (87%).
Positive result 
Positive Result

Christchurch is attractive to visitors

Overall visitor experience for Christchurch has been measured annually between 2014 and 2018, using a rating between 0 and 10 (where 0 = not at all satisfied; 10 = extremely satisfied). Christchurch measured 8.6 for both Australian and New Zealand domestic visitors in 2018, slightly higher than the average for the surveys from 2014 to 2016 of 8.4 and 8.5 for Australian and New Zealand visitors respectively. International visitors rated the city slightly lower at 8.4 in 2018, compared with an average of 8.2 since 2014.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Urban tree cover

In 2018/19, Christchurch (excluding Banks Peninsula) had 6000 ha of tree cover in both public and private areas. This is around 13.6% of the total urban area, down from 6740 ha (15.6% cover) in 2015/16. Tree loss largely occurred in the plantation forests and as a result of the 2017 Port Hills fire. Importantly, many of these areas will or have been replanted (and the species were too short to be captured in the latest survey). There was a 13% decrease in cover on privately owned land (660 ha), and an 11% decrease (48 ha) within street catchments.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Data sources: The big cities quality of life survey; ChristchurchNZ, Visitor experience survey; Christchurch City Council, Urban tree cover study.

Healthy water bodies

Water is a taonga, of fundamental importance to the life of the community and crucial to the health of the environment in which the community lives. 

The health of our water will be a key factor in setting the course for our environmental, social, cultural and economic wellbeing, now and into the future. 

Healthy water, from the source to the sea, is of critical importance to Ngāi Tahu, fundamental for the sustenance of Ngāi Tahu culture and spirituality.  Water is woven deep into the Ngāi Tahu identity.

What this means for our district:

  • Water is cared for in a sustainable and integrated way and in partnership with Papatipu Rūnanga and Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu,  in line with the principle of kaitiakitanga.
  • Water quality and ecosystems are protected and enhanced.
  • Our waterways support diverse and abundant mahinga kai.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Water quality index

In 2016 and 2017, 51% of monitored river sites had good or very good water quality. This declined in 2018 to 11%, before increasing to around 40% in 2019 and 2020. The Ōtūkaikino River has the best water quality in the City, with all its sites rated good or very good in all years except for 2018. Long term trends in water quality parameters at each site show that 64% met guidelines. The majority of parameters and sites (61%) irrespective of meeting the guidelines have not significantly changed since 2007, while 30% have improved and 10% declined.
Negative result 
Negative Result
 

Ihutai-Avon Heathcote Estuary water quality index

27% of sites in the Ihutai- Avon Heathcote Estuary in 2020 were classed as good or very good, while 55% were poor or very poor. This is within 5% of the average since 2014. However, the water quality at sites in the estuary has fluctuated considerably during this period, from 82% poor or very poor in 2017 to 45% good or very good in 2014. On average, over 50% of sites have had poor or very poor water quality in this period. ECAN noted the decline in water quality measured in 2017 may be explained by high rainfall events prior to sampling on 7 occasions.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Lake water quality – trophic level index

Te Waihora-Lake Ellesmere and Te Roto o Wairewa-Lake Forsyth have very poor water quality and are considered supertrophic. This means the Trophic Level Index (TLI) is greater than 5, and the lake is saturated in phosphorus and nitrogen. Te Roto o Wairewa-Lake Forsyth has gradually improved by 14% since 2004, however it is still classed as very poor with a TLI of 6.1. There has been no change in Te Waihora- Lake Ellesmere, with the 2019 TLI the same as the average since 2004 (6.8).
Negative result 
Negative Result

Data sources: Christchurch City Council, Waterway quality monitoring, Environment Canterbury, Ihutai-Avon Heathcote Estuary water quality monitoring; Environment Canterbury, Water quality data (reported on LAWA website).

High-quality drinking water

Access to clean drinking water is fundamental to wellbeing – everyone needs to have access to clean water that is safe to drink. 

The long-term impacts of climate change are likely to affect the availability of water and demand on public water supplies. 

This is directly in line with the healthy water outcome and Papatipu Rūnanga Ngāi Tahu is committed to providing high-quality drinking water to all communities.

What this means for our district:

  • The Council aims to deliver safe drinking water to its residents without the need for residual disinfection such as chlorination.
  • Our high-quality drinking water is used appropriately, to ensure the long-term availability of existing water sources.
  • We protect our high-quality groundwater supplies from potential sources of contamination.
  • Christchurch residents value their high-quality drinking water.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Compliance with the Health Act 1956 and Drinking water standards

In the year to June 2020, the drinking water supplied to 99.8% of the serviced population by the council complied with the Health Act. 640 people (0.2%) had water supplies that did not comply with the Health Act. They were in Birdlings Flat, Duvauchelles and Little River. This is a slight increase from 2019 where 99.5% of the serviced population complied. All the water supplies met the bacterial and chemical standards in both 2019 and 2020. However all the supplies except Akaroa, Takamatua and Wainui (1700 people) failed to meet the protozoal standard.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Population supplied that meets Bacteria or Protozoa guidelines

100% of the urban and rural populations serviced by the council's water supply complied with the bacterial standards in the year to June 2020, whereas only 8% of the rural service population and none of the urban population met the protozoal standard in the same year. These trends have been relatively consistent, except in 2018 the CDHB's Community and Public Health removed the protozoal compliance for all Council supplies. Since 2018, protozoa compliance has only been met for 8.5% of the population in rural supplies (2020) and none of the urban supplies.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Data sources: Ministry of Health, Annual drinking water quality reports; Christchurch City Council, Water supply compliance monitoring

Unique landscapes and indigenous biodiversity are valued and stewardship exercised

The city and district have unique environments and habitats that are nationally, internationally and culturally significant. The Resource Management Act entrusts us with responsibilities to maintain and protect our unique landscapes and indigenous biodiversity.

The natural environment is important to both physical and psychological wellbeing, so actions that promote and protect our environment also support wellbeing.  In turn, people and communities with strong wellbeing also tend to be environmentally responsible in their behaviour. 

We support community ownership of and action to protect their local environment.

What this means for our district:

  • We exercise kaitiakitanga / stewardship in ensuring that our unique landscapes and indigenous biodiversity are protected and enhanced for future generations.
  • Mana whenua maintain their association with landscapes and places that are important to them.
  • People feel a connection with, and responsibility towards the natural environment.

 How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Indigenous vegetation protected

Around 5,700 hectares (35%) of indigenous vegetation in threatened environments had some legal protection in 2021; an increase from 32.5% in 2010 (5,300 hectares). In 2021, 99% of threatened indigenous vegetation cover was in environments which had more than 70% of original cover cleared and/or less than 20% of land protected. The majority of protected indigenous vegetation is in public ownership (2,500 ha in 2021), with increases in the amount of protected indigenous vegetation held in conservation trusts and QEII covenants since 2010.
 Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Indigenous vegetation

Between 1996-2018, there was a net gain of just over 200 hectares (ha) of indigenous vegetation in the city and Banks Peninsula (equivalent to Hagley Park and Canterbury Agricultural Park combined). There were net gains in indigenous forest cover (9,250 to 9,350 ha), indigenous scrub/ shrubland (6,010 to 6,100 ha) and natural bare/ lightly vegetated surfaces (1,005 to 1,075 ha). There was an overall decrease (50 ha) in other herbaceous vegetation, and no change in tussock grassland. Over half of the net gain in indigenous vegetation was between 2001-2008.
 Positive result 
Positive Result

Landcover change in areas of significant landscape character

Between 1996-2018, areas classed by the District Plan as 'outstanding natural landscapes' had a 2.6% change in landcover type. This was largely due to 325 hectares (ha) of agricultural land being converted into exotic scrub and exotic forest. 'Rural amenity landscapes' had a 2.5% change in landcover and also lost a large amount of agriculture cover to exotic forest. Landscapes classed as having 'significant features' saw land changed from agricultural to urban (approximately 10 ha). Throughout the city there were small net gains in indigenous plantings.
 Mixed Result
Mixed Result
 

Abundance of key indigenous bird species

The korimako/bellbird and kererū/NZ pigeon have shown encouraging increases between 2004 and 2020, with the korimako increasing from 21 to 82, and the kererū from 18 to 40. The spotted shag has halved in nest numbers from over 22,000 in 1996 to around 8,500 in 2020. The variable oystercatcher at Ihutai/Avon-Heathcote estuary appears to have declined in number since 2008; however, Council ecologists note this species has spread elsewhere throughout Christchurch e.g. Banks Peninsula.
 Mixed Result
Mixed Result
 

Number of plant and animal species in the city by conservation status

The 2018 revision of New Zealand’s threatened plant species identifies approximately 138 nationally threatened and at-risk plant species found within the Christchurch district, including several endangered species that are only found in the district. Around 20% of these plant species are classed as nationally critical or nationally endangered. A large proportion (44%) of threatened and at-risk plants in the Christchurch district occur in ‘seral’ habitats (grasslands (18%), shrublands (12%) and second-growth forests (14%)).
 Snapshot 
Snapshot Only

Data sources: Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research (Landcover database v5 and Threatened environment classification 2012) and Christchurch City Council (Valuation data, GIS layers); Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research, Landcover database 5, CCC, District plan GIS overlays; Christchurch City Council, Biodiversity Team

Sustainable use of resources and minimising waste

The environment provides us with resources such as fresh air, clean water, food and materials that sustain our communities and economy.

Each person and organisation has a duty of care, to be kaitiaki/guardians - to use resource responsibly to ensure our current and future wellbeing.

In 2019 the Council declared a climate and ecological emergency and following scientific advice and community feedback, set a target of being carbon neutral as a city by 2045.  The Council aims to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions as an organisation by 2030.

Waste is a significant issue because it places growing demand on natural resources, while litter and pollution can harm life. Creating a circular economy is vital, so resources can continue to provide benefits in a closed-loop waste-free system.

What this means for our district:

  • Each person and organisation acts to reduce their impacts on the environment and minimise greenhouse gas emissions and waste.
  • Ōtautahi - Christchurch will actively work towards being carbon neutral by 2045 and the Council will work towards net zero emissions by 2030.
  • Waste in all its forms will be avoided, reduced, reused and recycled or composted.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Community carbon footprint

In the year to June 2019, net emissions for Christchurch was 2.5 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent (CO2e). This was an increase of 159,900 tonnes of CO2e since the year to June 2017 (7%). Transport emissions contributed over half of the gross emissions in 2019, followed by stationary energy with 19%. A reduction in forest size due to logging and the Port Hills fires reduced total carbon sequestration (the capture and storage of Co2) in the district, and was responsible for two thirds of the increase in net emissions.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Waste to landfill

In the year to June 2020, the city sent 205,000 tonnes of general waste to Kate Valley landfill. This is around 22% higher than the pre-earthquake volume of 167,500 tonnes in 2010, which was the first year after the 3 bin system was introduced which resulted in a 20% decrease. Waste to landfill after the earthquakes peaked in 2015 at 238,300 tonnes due to the rebuild. It has since declined by 14% in the year to June 2020 total. Waste per person peaked in 2006 at 739 kg per person and has since declined by 30% to 519 kg per person in 2020.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Waste diverted from landfill

Since 2009 when the 3 bin system was introduced, green/organic waste from kerbside and transfer stations almost doubled from 38,300 tonnes to 74,700 tonnes. During the same period, recycling collected from the kerbside has declined by 12%. The 3 bin system had less of an impact on recycling, as there were already recycling opportunities available including kerbside recycling before 2009. Recycling peaked between 2010 and 2017, averaging 45,700 tonnes per year, before declining to 33,800 tonnes in 2020, possibly due to Covid and yellow bin auditing.
 Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Water abstraction

In the year to June 2020, Christchurch abstracted the highest amount of water since 2004 with 57.9 million cubic metres. Following the earthquakes, the annual average abstraction was 50.7 million cubic metres per year, compared with 54.1 between 2004 and 2010. However, since the low of 47 million cubic metres in 2017, abstraction has increased steadily. Between 2004 and 2017, daily water abstraction per person declined from 419 litres to 340 litres. However, since 2017 it has increased to 402 litres per person per day.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Data sources: Christchurch City Council, Carbon community footprint; Christchurch City Council, Waste management data; Christchurch City Council, Water supply data and Statistics New Zealand, Subnational population estimates.

Great place for people, business and investment

A city that can attract minor and major economic activities and investments will be able to offer quality employment opportunities with an emphasis on sustainable, long-term practices, and overall better quality of life for its residents.

Sustainable economic development will help the city thrive and ensure this is a great place both for current and future generations. 

Papatipu Rūnanga Ngāi Tahu have long been committed to an intergenerational approach, setting goals based on the wellbeing of future generations. This is captured in the Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu mission statement, mō tātou, ā, mō kā uri ā muri ake nei – for us and our children after us.

We know that we will encounter future challenges and our ability to adapt and respond to these changes in a positive and constructive way will be critically important for our future prosperity.

What this means for our district:

  • Ōtautahi - Christchurch is regarded nationally and globally as a city that attracts people to do business, invest, study and live here.
  • Local businesses build the economic, social and environmental competitiveness of our city, delivering quality jobs and careers.
  • Our residents have access to an ideal balance between lifestyle and opportunity.
  • We value and encourage lifelong learning and skills development.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Overall quality of life

Prior to the earthquakes, the Quality of Life Survey found that respondents' overall quality of life increased throughout the 2000s, with 95% of residents rating their overall quality of life in Christchurch as good or extremely good in 2010. Since dropping to 77% in 2012, it is now at 87% in 2020, similar to the national average. The Canterbury Wellbeing Survey shows that quality of life is 11% higher for people on high incomes and 15% lower for those on $30,000 or less.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Innovative city index

The innovative cities score (out of a maximum 60 points) for Christchurch was relatively stable between 2011 and 2019 averaging 39, before increasing to 43 in 2021. Christchurch remains behind Wellington (44) but 2021 marked the first year Christchurch scored higher than Auckland. Out of the 500 cities in the 2021 index, Christchurch is ranked 122, up from 341 in 2014, while Wellington is 98 and Auckland is 159. Covid-19 resulted in no scores in 2020 and somewhat volatile rankings in 2021 due to the impacts of lockdowns and ongoing uncertainty.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Income (wage and salary)

Between 2012 and 2020, average weekly earnings in Christchurch increased by 29%, slightly higher than the national average increase of 27% over the same period. Since a new method of measuring weekly earnings was introduced in June 2019, earnings in Christchurch have increased by 8% to $1,232 per week at September 2021, compared with a national increase of 9% ($1,288). Between 2012 and 2021, Christchurch wages have averaged around 3.3% lower than the national average, an improvement from averaging 4.4% lower between 1989 and 2010.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Employment growth

Since February 2000, the number of people employed in Christchurch has grown by 35% to 215,200 at February 2021. This is lower than the growth rates of Auckland and Hamilton with 54% and 68% growth respectively, but greater than both Wellington and Dunedin. Covid-19 appears to have caused a small drop in annual employees for most large cities. Waimakariri and Selwyn districts' employment has more than doubled since 2000, and combined made up 15% of employment in Greater Christchurch in 2021 (37,000 out of 252,000), up from 9% in 2000.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Skills match between occupations and qualifications

Although 58% of Christchurch workers' occupations are well-matched with their qualifications, there is a growing proportion of people with qualifications higher than those needed for their jobs. This has increased from 17% in 2006 to 22% in 2018. Conversely, the proportion of people with qualifications lower than expected for a job has been declining from 25% in 2006 to 20% in 2018. This also reflects the growing number of people with higher qualification skills.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Employment by job skill level

In 2018, there were 84,700 medium-skilled jobs in Christchurch. However, employment in high skill occupations has increased by 15,500 people since 2006 to 75,000 jobs, accounting for 61% of the job growth in this period. The number of low and medium-skilled jobs increased by around 10%. Over the same period, high skill jobs in New Zealand increased at a greater rate (38%), and growth in low and medium-skilled jobs was around 20%.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Data sources: The big cities quality of life survey; 2thinknow Innovation CitiesTM Index; Statistics New Zealand, Quarterly economic survey; Statistics New Zealand, Business demography; Statistics New Zealand, Census of Population and Dwellings.

Inclusive, equitable economy with broad-based prosperity

A broad and inclusive economy unlocks the growth potential of disadvantaged communities and ensures everyone can share in the city’s prosperity.  

Stressors and challenges, such as rapid technological change and the impacts of a changing climate, may exacerbate existing inequalities.

What this means for our district:

  • Productive, sustainable growth improves the living standards and wellbeing of everyone in the community.
  • Inequality in the city is reduced.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Ability to meet the cost of everyday needs

44% of respondents to the 2020 Quality of Life survey said they had 'just enough' or 'not enough' money to meet their everyday needs (31% and 13% respectively). This is the lowest since the time series began in 2006, after peaking at 55% in 2016. As expected, people on lower incomes are more likely to struggle to afford everyday costs, at 58% for those on household incomes under $80,000 in 2020. Compared with other large New Zealand cities, Christchurch had the second-lowest proportion reporting just or not enough money for everyday needs.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Household income disparity

Between 2007 and 2019, the income of households falling within the lowest 20% of equivalised household incomes increased by $8,100 (from $24,200 to $32,300). During the same period, the top 20% of households had an increase of $31,200 (from $74,500 to $105,700). This indicates a widening gap between least and wealthiest households, with the wealthiest households experiencing an increase in income almost four times that of the lowest 20% of households.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Poverty – children in material hardship

Since 2013, an average of 11.7% of Christchurch children are estimated to live in material hardship (households that are missing out on things that could be expected in a typical household). This is lower than the national average of 14.6% (although the Christchurch figure has a higher degree of uncertainty). The Christchurch proportion has fluctuated over this period, and does not show a clear trend, whereas nationally there was 5% decrease between 2013 and 2019.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Percentage of children living in low-income households

20% of children in Christchurch live in low-income households after housing costs have been removed (defined as household income, after housing costs, of 50% of the median household equivalised disposable income or less for Christchurch). This has decreased overall since the series began in 2009. However, it is still 1 in 5 children living in poverty using this measure. This is slightly lower than the New Zealand rate of 22% in 2019.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Gender income gap

Male workers in Christchurch earn on average 15% ($166 per week) more than female workers in the year to December 2020. This is an improvement on men earning 20% more in 2018, 25% more in 2010 and 30% more in the mid-1990s. This is better than the New Zealand average of $200 per week or 17% in the year to December 2020. At the rate of improvement over the past 2 years (-2.5% per annum), pay parity could be reached in 6 years.
Positive result 
Positive Result

People living in low-income households

18% of people in Christchurch live in low-income households after housing costs have been removed (defined as household income, after housing costs, of 50% of the median household equivalised disposable income or less for Christchurch). This has fluctuated since 2009, and in 2019 Christchurch equalled the national rate for the first time in the 10 year time series.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Data sources: The big cities quality of life survey; Statistics New Zealand, Household economic survey; Statistics New Zealand, Quarterly employment survey.

A productive, adaptive and resilient economic base

Economic wellbeing helps us to achieve improvements in our overall wellbeing. 

Ōtautahi - Christchurch is part-way through an important period of change following the earthquake sequence and how we continue to adapt to this period of change will be important to our future prosperity. 

Ōtautahi - Christchurch has relatively low productivity by most measures compared with cities like Auckland and Wellington.

We have experienced unique challenges that we must learn from and share the knowledge gained. We know that we will face future challenges as well as having to adapt to ongoing stressors, such as an ageing population, rapid technological change and the challenges of climate change.

A productive, adaptive and resilient economy is important to Papatipu Rūnanga Ngāi Tahu.  Ngāi Tahu are a resilient people with a proud history of commercial activity and trade.  This has developed since the Treaty settlements into substantial financial and commercial operations that annually contribute over $200 million to the South Island economy and provides the financial support for the tribe’s intergenerational journey.

What this means for our district:

  • We improve our share of the national economy.
  • The city economy is prepared for and can respond to ongoing stressors and future challenges.
  • The city economy is growing in key sectors such as high tech.
  • We work hard to rebuild our tourism offering and sector.
  • We realise the benefits of being a Gateway City to Antarctica.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Gross domestic product (GDP and GDP per capita)

In the year to March 2020, Christchurch GDP was $28 billion. It increased by 50% between 2012 and 2020, compared with 52% nationally. On a per capita basis, Christchurch GDP is around 10% higher than the national average at $71,000. GDP per worker has more than doubled since 2000, from $61,400 to $128,000 per employee. Manufacturing; professional, scientific and technical services; and construction account for a third of Christchurch GDP, contributing around 11% each in 2019. However, manufacturing has declined from comprising 20% of GDP in 2000.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Value of exports

The combined value of exports from Christchurch airport and the Port of Lyttelton in the year to April 2021 was $7.3 billion. This was impacted by Covid19, with the value of exports 23% lower ($2.2 billion) than the same period the year before. Two-thirds of the loss was from the airport, which exported 46% less in value than the previous year. Even with the impact of Covid19, annual export values have doubled since 2000 for both the airport and port combined. The majority of growth for this period was through the Port of Lyttelton (80%).
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Estimated tourism spend

Covid19 impacted visitor spending, with Marketview data showing annual spend in the year to October 2021 ($855 million) was 5% lower than in the year to October 2019. However, it was 4% higher than the year ending October 2020. Domestic visitor spending in Christchurch in the year to October 2021 was 18% higher than the year to October 2020. MBIE's estimates for the ChristchurchNZ RTO area show a similar decline due to Covid19. Up until Covid19 restricted travel, visitor spend had increased by 33% compared to pre-earthquake levels.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Tertiary students and industrial trainees

Tertiary student enrolments in the 2020 calendar year numbered 33,200. This was 21% lower than pre-earthquake. University student numbers were only 5% lower than pre-earthquake, while Te Pūkenga/polytech students were 33% lower, private training students were 40% lower, and wananga students were 19% lower. Industrial training enrolment has increased by 14% since 2011. The majority of this has been in apprenticeships, which has increased by 75% from 2800 to 4900.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

SME and large business growth

At February 2019, 98% of Christchurch businesses had under 50 employees. 65% of these businesses are sole traders with no employees, while 32% have under 20 employees, and the remaining 3% have 20 to 49 employees. At 2019, 720 businesses had over 50 employees; an increase of 220 since 2000. Sole traders have had the greatest increase over this period with a 66% increase. Since the earthquakes, all groups except for small businesses grew by between 21% to 26%. Small businesses (1 to 19 employees) grew by only 8%.
Positive result 
Positive Result


 

Data sources: MBIE, Modeled Territorial Authority GDP, Statistics New Zealand, Regional GDPStatistics New Zealand, Overseas Cargo Statistics; MBIE, Monthly Regional Tourism Estimates, Ministry of Education, Tertiary Student Enrolments; Statistics New Zealand, Business Demography.

Modern and robust city infrastructure and facilities

Infrastructure supports much of our daily lives; it enables service delivery and economic activity and is vital to individual and community wellbeing. 

Maintaining good quality city infrastructure and community facilities is a challenging task, due to the pressures of an ageing and urbanising population, financial constraints, changing technology, and other factors.

What this means for our district:

  • Critical infrastructure can absorb and adapt to stressors and shocks, and be resilient to the challenges of climate change.
  • Robust and right-sized city infrastructure supports sustainable economic growth.
  • Reliable infrastructure is essential for our wellbeing, ensuring we have high-quality, safe drinking water and waste is safely and sustainably removed and disposed of.

How are we doing:

Key indicator results Status

Satisfaction with city infrastructure

Since the earthquakes, residents' satisfaction (satisfied and very satisfied) with Council infrastructure (wastewater, water supply, roads and footpaths) has decreased by 35% overall compared with 2010. Most of this loss has been for water supply, which decreased from around 80% satisfied in 2018 to 37% in 2019 due to chlorination of the Council's water supply in 2018. The earthquakes have had a big impact on satisfaction, with roads falling from 63% to 29% and footpaths from 67% to 36%. Wastewater has declined from 88% to 60%.
Negative result 
Negative Result

Satisfaction with community facilities

Around 95% of residents are satisfied with the council's libraries and sport and recreation facilities. This has fluctuated slightly since the earthquakes. Satisfaction with most of the city's parks declined after the earthquakes, except for the Botanic Gardens and Mona Vale which consistently score around 97%. Hagley Park has averaged 97% since asked in 2019. Satisfaction with regional and sport parks has increased from lows of 70% between 2016-2018 to over 85% in 2021. Satisfaction with community parks has remained at around 60% since 2015.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Condition of water and wastewater infrastructure assets

At 2021, 80% of stormwater pipes were in good or very good condition, compared with 68% of wastewater pipes and 74% of water supply pipes. Almost 750 kilometres of water supply pipes (21%) were in poor or very poor condition, meaning they have less than 15% of their theoretical useful life remaining. 220 kilometres of wastewater pipes (11%) were in poor or very poor condition, while around 80 kilometres of stormwater pipes (6%) were in poor or very poor condition.
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only

Ultra-fast broadband connectivity

In 2021, there were 132,300 customers connected and using fibre broadband services in the greater Christchurch coverage area. Since 2016, an average of 21,300 new customers have connected to the network each year. The network build was completed in 2019, with around 200,000 properties having the potential to access fibre. All of the urban areas of greater Christchurch are covered by the network, with the network only growing as new subdivisions are added to the network.
Positive result 
Positive Result

Condition of roading infrastructure

The roughness of Christchurch roads on average increased by 19% as a result of the earthquakes Since 2012, roads have slowly improved and are 8% better than post-earthquake. Compared with other cities (<90% urban), Christchurch roads are around 14-17% rougher, and compared with national values are over 40% rougher for primary and secondary collector and access roads, and around 30% rougher for arterial and low volume roads.
Mixed Result
Mixed Result

Condition of community facilities

In 2017, 48% of the council's community facilities were in good to very good condition (including those built post-earthquake and those in construction). 19% were in fair condition, while 16% were in poor condition and another 17% had not been assessed.
Snapshot 
Snapshot Only

Data sources: Christchurch City Council, General service satisfaction survey; Christchurch City Council, Point of contact resident survey and CERM survey; Christchurch City Council, Asset assessment intervention framework; Enable Networks, Annual reports; NZTA, Road Conditions Roughness Measures and Christchurch City Council, Transport asset management; Christchurch City Council, Community facilities network plan 2020.