Feedback on the plans for the Quarryman's Trail Cycleway closed Thursday, 10 November 2016.

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Background

Quarryman’s Trail - Puari ki Otūmatua connects Halswell to the Central City via Hoon Hay, Somerfield and Addington. The English name is a nod to the historic Halswell Quarry, while Otūmatua, a peak on the Port Hills, is the outstanding geographical feature of the south-west.

The route was developed to connect the residential growth areas around the south-west of the city. Quarryman's Trail offers another attractive transport option for city-bound commuters and for cyclists to get to the many local shops, businesses and activity centres. It will connect Halswell through to the existing shared pathways in South Hagley Park and the cycleways planned for the central city. Quarryman's Trail also connects to the Southern Lights and Nor’West Arc cycleways.

Contact details: Philippa Upton (03) 941 8808, or cycleways@ccc.govt.nz

Route selection

In developing Quarryman’s Trail, Council staff and technical experts from external agencies considered a number of different routes and types of cycleways. The route shown on this page provides the best connection to local amenities, schools and businesses, while maintaining a reasonably direct route for people biking to and from the central city, and minimising the impact on adjacent properties.

Assessing the options

There are a number of factors that determine the best route for a cycleway. For Quarryman’s, three route options were initially identified and assessed against multiple criteria designed to provide a balance between the needs of people wanting to cycle and the impacts of a cycleway on businesses, residents and the road network.
These criteria include:

  • Safety first
    For the cycleways to be effective and feel safe, the Major Cycle Routes must be built in a certain way. This means separating people on bikes from motor vehicles in some areas, and slowing vehicles and reducing volumes in others. Generally, the preferred location for Major Cycle Routes is on quieter streets with fewer trucks. However, this can be difficult to achieve where the route gets closer to the central city and / or needs to link through commercial or rural areas.
  • Traffic network considerations
    Building safe cycle routes is one way to make the transport network more resilient. Where the proposed cycle route significantly changes the road, the Council must assess the likely impact on the rest of the transport network. In some cases plans for the route need to be amended to avoid causing signifcant traffic delays and congestion elsewhere.
  • Business impacts
    The Council recognises that existing parking is very important, particularly for local shops which rely on passing custom. Where possible, we have retained existing restricted parking zones in their current form or proposed alternative restricted on-street parking close by.
  • Residential impacts
    The Council is aware of the need to balance diff erent travel needs including parking and we have carefully considered 

    options to keep as much parking as possible. However, when planning safe, direct cycleways using limited available space, 

    there will be times when vehicle parking does not take priority. 

    To read the detailed Quarryman’s Trail Scheme Assessment 

    Report visit ccc.govt.nz/cycleways
  • Rubbish collection and street cleaning
    Building a safe cycleway will require changes to some service 

    operations along the route. For example, street cleaning will 

    be diff erent along the new cycleway. Rubbish collection will also change for some residents and businesses. If you have onstreet parking outside your property, there will be space next 

    to the cycleway separator island for your wheelie bins (you will get more information about this as the project progresses). 

    Where there is no on-street parking, residents and businesses will continue with their current roadside collection.
  • Connecting with the central city  
    Transport network plans for the central city have been developed as part of An Accessible City, the transport chapter of the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan. This plan includes lower speed limits and priority on some roads for people travelling on foot or by bike. To the north of Moorhouse Avenue the Quarryman’s Trail route will connect with similar separated cycleways on Antigua Street, as part of the An Accessible City programme.

Along Antigua Street the Major Cycleway is separated and requires space that will reduce the amount of on street parking by approximately 70%.
Along Strickland Street where separated cycleways are proposed, on-street parking is reduced by approximately 60%.
Along Frankleigh Street and Sparks Road, on-street parking spaces are reduced by approximately 50% to make room for the cycleway.
Some further parking removal is required for pedestrian crossing safety improvements.
Parking will be removed to install traffic signals where Quarryman’s Trail crosses Hendersons Road, Hoon Hay Road, Lyttelton Street, Barrington Street and Disraeli Street.
Further parking will be removed on side roads, to make room for the upgraded intersections and crossings and to improve safety.

What about tree removal? 

In some areas we will need to remove trees to make room for the cycleways. Trees to be removed will be replaced in suitable locations nearby.

Along the whole route we have identified approximately 16 trees that will need to be removed. Replacement trees will be planted close by, once we have determined the location of underground services.

Route description

Route options for each section have been assessed against the criteria detailed above, to determine the best route for each section, while keeping in mind how the sections fit together to form a continuous route.

  1. Halswell Road to Lyttelton Street (Halswell to Hoon Hay)
    The starting point of the Quarryman’s Trail is Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre on Halswell Road, opposite the Halswell Shopping Centre. A route along Halswell Road, through Halswell Domain, emerging opposite the end of James Hight Drive has been identified as the preferred option. This route provides good connection with some of the main amenity areas in Halswell Domain and avoids some of the more secluded areas. It also connects with residential areas west of Halswell Road via Lillian Street, and between Halswell Domain and Sparks Road.
    From this point, the preferred route travels along James Hight Drive, to Milns Road. From Milns Road, the recently developed Milns Drain Reserve provides a natural connection through to Sparks Road. This route avoids the sweeping bend on Sparks Road that intersects Milns Road and Sutherland Road, which would be a less safe environment for a cycleway.
    Sparks Road is the preferred route for Quarryman’s Trail between Halswell and Lyttelton Street. There is a lack of other more direct on-road options between these points that also connect to the main destinations in the area.
  2. Lyttelton Street to Brougham Street Options (blue route on Route Options Map)

    Quarrymans Trail map options

    Route options map: blue indicates the preferred route. Click to enlarge

    At Lyttelton Street, three different route options were considered to continue the Quarryman’s Trail onwards towards the central city. The preferred route is Sparks Road, Frankleigh Street, Strauss Place, Roker Street and Strickland Street. Out of all options considered, this is the shortest, most direct route, with the fewest number of turns. It also provides a good connection for residents and businesses. This is the blue route on the Route Options Map below.
    An option to run the route along Milton Street instead of Roker Street was also considered. Roker Street is preferred because it is quieter and a cycleway will have less impact on residential and business parking. The Milton Street option would require the removal of most on-street parking to accommodate the cycleway. Roker Street also provides an enjoyable cycling environment and a good connection to surrounding areas, for example through Bradford Park and Somerfield Park.

    The other routes considered for this section were: 

    Lyttelton Street, Wychbury Street, Bletsloe Avenue and Strickland Street (green route on Route Options Map):
    While this route generally avoids busy roads, it is not as direct. Also, sections of this route are close to the Little River Link Major Cycle Route and a considerable distance from the suburb of Somerfi eld. This means the route will not provide a useful link for many people within the area. The removal of some on-street parking would be required throughout the route. A variation of this route along Athelstan Street past Barrington Mall was also considered. While this would have provided a good connection to the Mall, there were safety concerns around bus stops and the amount of traffic that would need to turn across the cycleway. Parking around the Mall would also have been aff ected. For these reasons this option was discounted.

    Lyttelton Street, Stanbury Avenue, Studholme Street, Penrith Avenue and Strickland Street (red route on Route Options Map):
    This route is considerably longer, with more changes in direction than the alternatives considered. It also has limited connection to much of Spreydon and Barrington Mall. For these reasons this option was discounted.

  3. Central city connection: Brougham Street to Moorhouse Avenue

     Antigua Street is the preferred route for the Quarryman’s Trail south of Moorhouse Avenue because it links to the key central city cycle route that connects with existing and future cycleways on Tuam Street, St Asaph Street and in Hagley Park via Oxford Terrace. Antigua Street is also a good link to the proposed Southern Lights Major Cycle Route which connects the suburbs around Beckenham to the central city. This direct cycle route avoids central city roads prioritised for vehicle traffic, such as Selwyn and Montreal Streets.

Full plans

Halswell Road and Halswell Domain

Halswell Road

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Halswell Road: 

Quarrymans Trail map Halswell road

Click to enlarge

  1. A new shared pedestrian and cycle path begins at the entrance to Te Hapua: Halswell Centre and continues along the eastern side of Halswell Road.
  2. The existing on-road painted cycle lanes will be kept for experienced cyclists to use. 
  3. On-street parking on the eastern side of Halswell Road needs to be removed to make room for the shared path. 
  4. The southbound bus stop outside the Halswell Domain will shift approximately 40 metres to the north to make room for the shared path. 

Halswell Domain

Key feature of the proposed cycleway in Halswell Domain:

 Quarrymans Trail map Halwell domain

Click to enlarge 

  1. A new 3.5 metre wide shared pedestrian and cycle path between Halswell Road and James Hight Drive. 

The cycleway will improve access for local residents to Halswell Domain and attractions such as the model railway and playground.

 

James Hight Drive and Milns Drain Reserve

Key features of the proposed cycleway on James Hight Drive:

 Quarrymans Trail map James Hight Drive

Click to enlarge

  1. The existing bridge at the eastern side of Halswell Domain, opposite James Hight Drive, will remain.
  2. An improved crossing Over William Brittan Avenue makes it safer for people to cross from the shared path through Halswell Domain to a new shared path on the northern side of James Hight Drive. This requires the removal of one tree on William Brittan Avenue. 
  3. A crossing at the western end of James Hight Drive makes it easy for people travelling by bike to get on and off the shared path. Cyclists will have right of way over vehicle drivers. This requires the removal of one tree outside No. 2 James Hight Drive. 
  4. On-street parking needs to be removed on James Hight Drive, near the intersection with William Brittan Avenue, to make room for the cycle crossing. 
  5. The James Hight Drive cycle facility is on road, with cyclists and motor vehicles sharing the road space. Road markings will indicate to drivers that this is a shared space. 
  6. A 30km/hr speed limit on James Hight Drive provides a safer environment for cyclists. The 30km/hr speed restriction will include Dunsford Close and Cridland Place. 
  7. Raised platforms at regular interviews will help encourage lower speeds. They will be installed outside No. 3/4-6, No. 12/15, and No. 27/28 James Hight Drive. 
  8. The existing pathway on the eastern corner of James Hight Drive and Milns Road is widened to become a shared pedestrian and cycle path. 
  9. A cycle crossing at the eastern end of James Hight Drive makes it easy for people travelling by bike to get on and off the cycle path from James Hight Drive. Cyclists will have right of way over vehicle drivers. 
  10. Some on-street parking needs to be removed on James Hight Drive near the intersection with Milns Road, to make room for the cycle crossing. 

Milns Drain Reserve

Key features of the proposed cycleway through Milns Drain Reserve: 

 Quarrymans Trail map Milns Darin Reserve

Click to enlarge

  1. The existing pathway on the eastern corner of James Hight Drive and Milns Road is widened to become a shared pedestrian and cycle path. 
  2. An improved crossing over Milns Road makes it safer and easier for people to cross from the new shared path from James Hight Drive to Milns Reserve. 
  3. The existing gravel path through Milns Drain Reserve will be widened and sealed. The existing bridge will remain. 
  4. The shared path through Milns Drain Reserve turns onto the shoulder of Sparks Road, where it continues towards Hoon Hay. 

 

Sparks Road

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road: 

 Quarrymans Trail map Sparks Road

Click to enlarge

  1. A new, 3 metre wide shared pedestrian and cycle path runs along the north-western side of Sparks Road from Milns Drain Reserve towards Hoon Hay. The location of the path shown is indicative. 

Sparks Road

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road: 

 Quarrymans Trail map Sparks Road

Click to enlarge

  1. A new, 3 metre wide shared pedestrian and cycle path runs along the north-western side of Sparks Road. The location of the path shown is indicative. 
  2. Traffic calming on Sparks Road will alert drivers to a change in the road ahead. Trees will be planted at this location, subject to the location of underground services. 

Sparks Road / Hendersons Road intersection

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road: 

 Quarrymans Trail map Sparks and Hendersons Roads

Click to enlarge

  1. The roundabout at the intersection of Sparks Road and Hendersons Road is replaced by traffic signals to improve safety for all road users.
  2. West of Hendersons Road and on the northern side of Sparks Road there is a 3 metre wide shared path.
  3. East of Hendersons Road and on the southern side of Sparks Road a two-way cycleway is protected from traffic by a separator island.
  4. The new signals have a diagonal crossing to link the cycleways east and west of Hendersons Road. The signals will provide separate phasing for people on bikes to cross safely.
  5. New cycle lanes on Hendersons Road will approach the traffic lights.

Cyclists will cross Hendersons Road diagonally between the shared path to the went and the cycleway to the east. Pedestrians will cross Hendersons Road directly from the shared path to the existing footpath.
 

Sparks Road

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road: 

 Quarrymans Trail map Sparks Road

Click to enlarge

  1. A two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road is protected from traffic by separator islands. 
  2. On-street parking is retained on the northern side of Sparks Road. However, parking will not be permitted on the southern side. 
  3. Gaps in the cycleway separator islands allow cyclists to get on and off the cycleway from the properties opposite. 

Having a two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road means people riding bikes will cross through fewer intersections than if one-way cycleways were provided on both sides of the road. 

Sparks Road

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road: 

 Quarrymans Trail map Sparks Road

Click to enlarge

  1. A two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road is protected from traffic by separator islands. 
  2. On-street parking is retained on the northern side of Sparks Road. However, parking will not be permitted on the southern side. 
  3. Gaps in the cycleway separator islands allow cyclists to get on and off the cycleway from the properties opposite. 

Sparks Road

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road:

 Quarrymans Trail map Sparks Road

Click to enlarge

  1. A two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road is protected from traffic by separator islands. 
  2. A painted flush median makes it safer and easier for drivers to turn into properties and side roads along this section of the route. 
  3. A new refuge island adjacent to Victors Road will help people access the cycleway to and from Victors Road. 
  4. A new pedestrian refuge island adjacent to Gainsborough Street will help cyclists and pedestrians safely cross Sparks Road. 
  5. On-street parking on the southern side of Sparks Road needs to be removed to make room for the cycleway and the flush median. 
  6. Most on-street parking is retained on the northern side of Sparks Road. However, some parking needs to be removed to provide safe crossing points for cyclists and pedestrians. 

Having a two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road means people riding bikes will cross through fewer intersections than if one-way cycleways were provided on both sides of the road. 

Sparks Road

Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road:

 Quarrymans Trail map Sparks Road

Click to enlarge

    1.  A two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road is protected from traffic by separator islands.
    2. A painted flush median makes it safer and easier for drivers to turn into properties and side roads along this section of the route. 
    3. A new pedestrian refuge island adjacent to Maryhill Avenue will help cyclists and pedestrians to safely cross Sparks Road. Some on-street parking on the northern side of Sparks Road needs to be removed to make room for this crossing. 
    4. On-street parking on the southern side of Sparks Road needs to be removed to make room for the cycleway and the flush median. 

    Having a two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road means more car parks can be kept than if one-way cycleways were provided on both sides of the road. 

      Sparks Road and Hoon Hay Road

      Sparks Road and Hoon Hay Road

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road:

       Quarrymans Trail map Sparks and Hoon Hay Roads

      Click to enlarge

      1. The roundabout at the intersection of Sparks Road and Hoon Hay Road is replaced with traffic signals to improve safety for cyclists and pedestrians and improve traffic flow. 
      2. Turning traffic on Sparks Road is held by red arrows to allow people travelling by bike and on foot to cross Hoon Hay Road safely. 
      3. A two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road is protected from traffic by separator islands.
      4. Shared path areas on the two southers corners of Sparks Road at the intersection with Hoon hay Road will allow cyclists travelling along Hoon Hay Road to get on and off the cycleway. 
      5. A flush median makes it safer and easier for drivers to turn into properties along this section of the route. 
      6. On-street parking needs to be removed on the southern side of Sparks Road to accommodate the cycleway and flush median. 
      7. A new signalised crossing located between the gates of Hoon Hay School and Our Lady of Assumption School allows pedestrians to cross Sparks Road safely. 
      8. Removal of some on-street parking to allow for space for the signals at the crossing is offset by on-street parking gained from the removed zebra crossing. Existing P3 school parking is retained although some will be relocated due to the crossing signals. 
      9. Rydal Street becomes a cul-de-sac at Sparks Road, with left-turn only from Sparks Road. Evidence shows that vehicles turning across a two-way cycleway on and off a busy road significantly reduces the safety of people travelling by bike. 
      10. Two trees on Rydal Street are removed. Replacements are planned nearby, avoiding underground services. 
      11. A new shared path on the southern side of Sparks Road runs between the new crossing signals and Rydal Street. 

      Rydal Street becomes a cul-de-sac at Sparks Road, with left-turn only at Sparks Road.

      Hoon Hay Road

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Hoon Hay Road:

       Quarrymans Trail map Hoon Hay Road

      Click to enlarge

      1. Cycle lanes on both sides of Hoon Hay Road require the removal of some on-street parking. This allows room for both cycles and vehicles at the intersection and improves safety for all users. 
      2. Traffic signals at the intersection with Hoon Hay Road allow removal of the existing school crossing outside Our Lady of the Assumption School.

      Cyclists wishing to access Quarryman's Trail from Hoon Hay Road can do so using the shared path areas or cycle 'hook turn' boxes, painted on the road. Signs will guide people onto the correct path.

      Sparks Road, Frankleigh and Lyttelton Streets

      Sparks Road

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road:

       Quarrymans Trail map Sparks Road

      Click to enlarge

      1. A two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road is protected from traffic by separator islands.
      2. A painted flush median makes it safer and easier for drivers to turn into properties and side roads along this section of the route.
      3. On-street parking needs to be removed on the southern side of Sparks Road to make room for the cycleway and the flush median.
      4. Some on-street parking needs to be removed on the northern side of Sparks Road to make room for the pedestrian refuge island adjacent to Pablo Place. 
      5. The eastbound bus stop (#1) to the west of Pablo Place is relocated closer to Pablo Place outside No. 59 Sparks Road. The existing location is too close to the Hoon Hay Road signalised intersection.
      6. The eastbound bus stop (#2) to the west of Waimokihi Place is relocated to the eastern side of Waimokihi Place . 
      7. The west-bound bus stop between Waimokihi Place and Pablo Place is retained. The cycleway is raised to the footpath level and becomes a shared space to improve bus passenger safety. Cyclists will give way to pedestrians at the bus stop. The flush median is narrowed so vehicles can pass a stopped bus.

      The Nor’West Arc Major Cycle Route will potentially cross Sparks Road between Pablo Place and the Centennial Park pathway. Details of this route and crossing are still being developed, and will be consulted on at a later stage. Bus stops will move as a result of this work. See points five, six and seven above.

      Sparks Road, Frankleigh and Lyttelton Streets

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Sparks Road and Frankleigh Streets:

       Quarrymans Trail map Sparks, Frankleigh and Lyttelton

      Click to enlarge

      1. Traffic signals replace the roundabout at Sparks Road, Frankleigh Street and Lyttelton Street, making the intersection safer for for cyclists and pedestrians, and improving traffic flow.
      2. Turning traffic on Sparks Road is held by red arrows to help cyclists and pedestrians cross Lyttelton Street safely.
      3. A two-way cycleway on the southern side of Sparks Road is protected from traffic by separator islands.
      4. The shared path on the two southern corners of Sparks Road and Frankleigh Street, at the intersection with Lyttelton Street, will help people travelling by bike on Lyttelton Street to get on and off the cycleway.
      5. A painted flush median will make it safer and easier for drivers to turn into properties and side roads.
      6. On-street parking on the southern side of Sparks Road and Frankleigh Street needs to be removed to make room for the cycleway and flush median. Some on-street parking from the northern side is also removed to make room for the traffic signals.
      7. The westbound bus stop (#3) outside No. 32 Frankleigh Street (See sheet #17) is shifted approximately 70 m west to a safer location outside No. 22 and 24. The flush median is narrowed so that vehicles can pass a stopped bus.

      The Nor’West Arc Major Cycle Route will potentially cross Sparks Road and Frankleigh Street at Lyttelton Street. Details of this route and crossing are still being developed, and will be consulted on at a later stage. Bus stops will move as a result of this work. See point seven above.

      Lyttelton Street

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Lyttelton Street:

       Quarrymans Trail map Lyttelton Street

      Click to enlarge

      1. New cycle lanes are provided on Lyttelton Street to the south of the intersection. The cycle lanes to the north will be maintained.
      2. The removal of some parking along Lyttelton Street, on both sides of the intersection, is needed to make room for the new traffic signals.
      3. Existing bus stops on the southern side of Lyttelton Street, near the intersection, are retained.

      Cyclists wishing to access Quarryman’s Trail from Lyttelton Street can do so using the shared path areas or cycle 'hook turn' boxes, painted on the road. Signs will guide people onto the correct path.

      Frankleigh Street

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Frankleigh Street:

       Quarrymans Trail map Frankleigh Street

      Click to enlarge

      1. A two-way cycleway provided on the southern side of Frankleigh Street is protected from traffic by separators islands.
      2. A painted flush median makes it safer and easier for drivers to turn into properties.
      3. On-street parking needs to be removed on the southern side of Frankleigh Street to make room for the cycleway and flush median. 
      4. Some on-street parking needs to be removed on the northern side of Frankleigh Street, to make room for new pedestrian refuge islands between No. 29 and 30, and No. 53 and 46/48 Frankleigh Street.
      5. The westbound bus stop (#3) outside No. 32 Frankleigh Street (see sheet #15) is shifted approximately 70m west to a safer location outside No. 22 and 24.

      Bus stops will move as a result of this work. See point five above. 

      Roker, Frankleigh, and Barrington Streets and Strauss Place

      Frankleigh Street, Strauss Place, Barrington Street and Roker Street

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Frankleigh Street, Strauss Place, Barrington Street and Roker Street:

       Quarrymans Trail map Frankleigh, Strauss and Roker St

      Click to enlarge

      1. A cycle path connects the two-way cycleway on Frankleigh Street with Strauss Place. This requires the removal of one on-street parking space and one tree (which will be replaced nearby, avoiding underground services).
      2. Strauss Place is a quiet cul-de-sac and people on bikes are able to share the road with general traffic.
      3. A new cycle path at the eastern end of Strauss Place links to a shared path on Barrington Street. This requires the removal of one on-street parking space and one tree (which will be replaced nearby, avoiding underground services).
      4. A signalised cycle and pedestrian crossing on Barrington Street will help cyclists and pedestrians cross from Strauss Place to a new shared path through to Roker Street. The crossing will be coordinated with the existing traffic signals at the intersection of Barrington Street and Milton Street to make traffic flow as smooth as possible.
      5. The existing bus stops on Barrington Street are relocated to make space for the new crossing. The northbound bus stop shifts approximately 30 metres north, to the other side of Strauss Place. The southbound bus stop shifts slightly south, from outside No. 220 to outside No. 218.
      6. The shared path between Barrington Street and Roker Street requires land purchase. The final layout will depend on the outcome of Council discussions with landowners.
      7. A length of on-street parking removed at the western end of Roker Street will help drivers turn around easily, and avoid reversing across the path of people on bikes.
      8. The cycle route continues on Roker Street. Low traffic volumes and speeds means Roker Street needs only minor changes to make it safe for people on bikes to share the road with general traffic. The changes include raised platforms, improved intersections and a 30 km/h speed limit.

      The minor changes to Roker Street will also make it safer and more comfortable for people walking and living along the street. Bus stops will be removed as a result of this work. See point five above. 

      Roker Street

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Roker Street:

       Quarrymans Trail map Roker St

      Click to enlarge

      1. Cyclists and motor vehicles will share the road on Roker Street. Road markings will remind drivers that this is a shared space.
      2. A 30 km/h speed limit on Roker Street provides a safer environment for people on bikes.
      3. A raised platform outside 21/22 Roker Street encourages lower speeds.
      4. All existing trees are retained and new trees are proposed at several locations, avoiding underground services.
      5. Narrowing the intersection of Roker Street and Simeon Street and installing a raised platform reduces vehicle speeds and improves visibility. This requires the removal of some on-street parking on both Roker Street and Simeon Street.

      Low traffic volumes and speeds on Roker Street will allow cyclists to safely share the space on the road with motor vehicles.

      Roker Street

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Roker Street:

       Quarrymans Trail map Roker St

      Click to enlarge

      1. On Roker Street, cyclists and motor vehicles share the road. Road markings will remind drivers that this is a shared space.
      2. A 30 km/h speed limit on Roker Street provides a safer environment for people on bikes.
      3. Raised platforms outside No. 50/53 and No. 64/69 Roker Street will encourage lower speeds.
      4. Removal of some on-street parking on both Roker Street and Selwyn Street is needed to provide safe crossing at refuge islands on Selwyn Street, and to allow cycle path access to the crossings.

      Roker Street provides a good connection to Bradford Park and Somerfield Park

      Roker Street, Strickland Street and Milton Street

      Roker Street and Strickland Street

      The key elements of the proposed cycleway on this section of Roker Street and Strickland Street:

       Quarrymans Trail map Roker and Strickland St

      Click to enlarge

      1. On Roker Street, cyclists and motor vehicles share the road. Road markings remind drivers that this is a shared space.
      2. A 30 km/h speed limit on Roker Street provides a safer environment for people to travel by bike.
      3. Raised platforms outside No. 102/107 and No. 116/121 Roker Street will encourage lower speeds.
      4. Crossing signals at the end of Roker Street, opposite Bradford Park, will help cyclists and pedestrians safely cross Strickland Street.
      5. A tree needs to be removed outside the entrance to Bradford Park to make room for the crossing. A replacement tree will be planted nearby, avoiding underground services.
      6. The Quarryman’s Trail Major Cycle Route continues north on Strickland Street with separated cycleways on each side of the road. On-street parking is removed on the eastern side of Strickland Street to make room for the new signalised crossing and the cycleway.
      7. The proposed Southern Lights Major Cycle Route continues south on Strickland Street, connecting into the Tennyson Street cycleway in Beckenham.

      Bradford Park connects through to Sydenham and Colombo Street via pathways and quiet, cycle-friendly streets.

      Strickland Street and Milton Street

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Strickland Street.

       Quarrymans Trail map Strickland and Milton St

      Click to enlarge

      1. One-way cycleways on both sides of Strickland Street are protected from traffic by separator islands.
      2. Turning traffic on Strickland Street is held by red arrows to allow cyclists and pedestrians to safely cross Milton Street.
      3. On-street parking needs to be removed on the eastern side of Strickland Street between Roker Street and Milton Street to make room for the cycleway.
      4. On-street parking needs to be removed on the western side of Strickland Street, between Milton Street and Moore Street, to make room for the cycleway.
      5. On-street parking needs to be removed on the eastern side of Strickland Street between Moore Street and Burns Street, to make room for the cycleway.
      6. One street tree on the eastern side of Strickland Street needs to be removed to make room for the cycleway and traffic lanes at the intersection with Milton Street.
      7. Ten street trees need to be removed on the western side of Strickland Street between Milton Street and Bletsloe Avenue, to make room for the cycleway while retaining parking on one side of the road. Replacement trees will be planted across the road and nearby, in suitable locations, avoiding underground services.

      Strickland Street

      Key features of the proposed cycleway on this section of Strickland Street:

       Quarrymans Trail map Strickland Street

      Click to enlarge

      1. One-way cycleways on both sides of Strickland Street are protected from traffic by separator islands.
      2. On-street parking needs to be removed on the eastern side of Strickland Street between Moore Street and Burns Street, to make room for the cycleway.
      3. On-street parking needs to be removed on the western side of Strickland Street, between Burns Street and Deyell Crescent to make room for the cycleway.
      4. On-street parking needs to be removed on the western side of Strickland Street between Deyell Crescent and Brougham Street, to make room for the cycleway.
      5. Ten street trees need to be removed on the western side of Strickland Street between Milton Street and Bletsloe Avenue to allow room for the cycleway and retain parking on one side of the road. Replacement trees will be planted across the road in suitable locations, avoiding underground services.
      6. Painted flush medians at the Manhire Street/Burns Street intersection and the Bletsloe Avenue/Deyell Crescent intersection will help drivers turn into these roads by providing a safe space to wait, clear of traffic.
      7. A pedestrian refuge island next to Manhire Street and Burns Street provides a safe crossing point for pedestrians.<