An integrated transport system that is efficient and offers a range of travel options is critical for ensuring Christchurch develops into a globally competitive city with an excellent quality of life.

There is a range of travel options

For the future wellbeing of the city, it is important that a range of attractive and efficient transport options are available and easily accessible. Increasing the availability of travel choice, while strategically targeting improvements to the freight and road networks, will improve the efficiency and safety of our entire transport system.

Key points

  • The proportion of residents who believe Christchurch is cycle friendly has doubled from 26% in 2014, to 53% in 2016.
  • The proportion of people who agree the city is walking friendly (84% in 2016) has risen to near the pre-earthquake level (88%).
  • Since the earthquakes, road delay per km increased by 29% between March 2010 and March 2014 for the all day average. The afternoon peak increased by 35% during the same period.  
  • The all day average travel speed has decreased by 11.8% since March 2009.
  • A high number of respondents still think public transport is affordable, safe, easy to get to, frequent and reliable.
  • However, an increasing proportion feel public transport is getting less affordable, and is not easy to get to, frequent or reliable.

Cycle Friendly City

Cycle Friendly City grapg

Source: CCC, General Satisfaction Survey


Walking Friendly City

Walking Friendly City graph

Source: CCC, General Satisfaction Survey


Perceptions of Public Transport

Perceptions of Public Transport graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey


More detail and information

Transport For Christchurch: The Transport for Christchurch website has been developed to assist road users in Christchurch find the quickest and safest route around the city.

The transport system provides access to activities

Christchurch's transport system should provide people with effective access to social, cultural and economic activities. Access to these activities are essential to resident's livelihood, as well as ensuring that they remain engaged with their local communities.

Key facts

  •  Since 2006, the number of people who travel between 10 and 20 kilometres to work has increased, while there has been a decrease in the number of people travelling under 5 kilometres
  • The greatest proportion of people have to travel between 5 - 7.5 kilometres in order to get to work. This trend has not been affected by the earthquakes.
  • Although the graph shows that the greatest proportion of people travel between 5 and 7.5 kilometres to get to work, it is important to note that 46% of people actually travel less than 5 kilometres.
  • The number of people who use active modes of transport to get to work declined by around 2% between 2006 and 2013. 
  • The proportion of people with access to key activity centres continues to remain relatively the same. 
  • While 89% of people feel parks are very easy to access, an increasing proportion of people feel accessing parks has become more difficult following the earthquakes. 
  • Although around 90% of people feel that parks are very easy or easy to access, an increasing proportion feel that they do not have good access to parks. 

Distance Traveled to Work

Distance to Work graph

Source: Statistics NZ, Census of Population & Dwellings


Active Modes to Work

Active Modes to Work graph

Source: Statistics NZ, Census of Population & Dwellings


Access to Parks

Access to Parks graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey


Access to Key Activity Centres

Access to Key Activity Centres graph

Source: Statistics NZ, Census of Population & Dwellings


More detail and information

Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan 2012 - 2042: The Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan 2012-2042 is a 30 year vision for transport within the city, adopted by the Council in late 2012.

Increased use of active and public transport

The most effective way to improve journey time reliability, reduce the impact of transport emissions on the environment and create healthy, liveable and resilient communities is to increase the number of people who use public transport, walking and cycling to move around the city.

Key points

  • Walking trips have declined post-earthquake, however they started to increase again in 2013/14.
  • Cycling trips have increased post-earthquake, compared with the declining trend pre-earthquake.
  • Walking remains the most common alternative mode of transport for getting to school, increasing by 5% in the 2013/14 year.
  • Pre-earthquake public transport was recovering from a low in the early 1990s. However, since the earthquake it dropped to around two thirds of its pre-earthquake level, and is now beginning to rise again, but is yet to reach pre-earthquake levels.
  • Over half of the residents in Christchurch do not use the public transport system at least once a month, compared with 40% pre-earthquake.

Non-Car Trips by Mode

Non Car Trips by Mode graph

Source: MoT, Household Travel Survey


Students Travelling to Education

Trips to Education graph

Source: MoT, Household Travel Survey


Bus Patronage

Bus Patronage graph

Source: Environment Canterbury


Public Transport Frequency of Use

Public Transport Frequency of Use graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey


More detail and  information

Canterbury Regional Public Transport Plan 2014: The Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) is a legislative document that sets out the objectives and policies for delivering public transport in Canterbury.

Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan 2012 - 2042: The Christchurch Transport Strategic Plan 2012-2042 is a 30 year vision for transport within the city, adopted by the Council in late 2012.