As a democratic organisation responsible for making decisions that affect our community, the Council must operates in ways that promote transparency and public confidence.

Clear communication with the community

The need to communicate Council direction and decisions in a way that is well received by residents, and that they can understand is at the core of all council business. Ensuring residents are both aware of, and understand this information is an important part of local decision making. 

Key points

  • In 2016, 51% of respondents were satisfied with opportunities to access information about Council decisions, an increasing proportion since 2012.
  • The proportion of residents who were dissatisfied increased slightly from the previous year, with 20% of respondents indicating they were dissatisfied in 2016.
  • The CERA Wellbeing Survey indicates that the satisfaction with CCC communications about Earthquake recovery decisions has decreased by 4% in the last year.

Satisfaction with Information Communication

Satisfaction with Information Communication graph

Source: CCC, General Satisfaction Survey


Communication of Earthquake Recovery Decisions

Communication of Earthquake Recovery Decisions graph

Source: CERA Wellbeing Survey(external link)

Transparent and informed decision making

Local democracy should be conducted in an open and transparent way so that residents can judge for themselves the quality of decisions being made on their behalf. All Council information is therefore publicly available unless there are valid reasons for confidentiality, such as privacy or commercial sensitivity. Similarly, all decisions are made in a public forum unless there are valid reasons for confidentiality. 

Key points

  • The Quality of Life Survey shows that the proportion of residents who felt they understand how Council makes decisions has increased to 32% in the year to 2016, the same as 2014. However the general trend has been for decreasing levels of understanding since 2004.
  • The proportion of respondents who did not understand how Council decisions are made decreased from its peak in 2012 of over 50%, to 41%.
  • In 2016, Christchurch had the lowest proportion of people who disagreed that council makes decisions in the best interest of the city (26%) when compared to Auckland (37%), Wellington (27%) and Dunedin (32%).
  • Confidence in the CCC making earthquake recovery decisions has declined to 27% compared with 33% indicating they were confident in September 2014. 

Understanding of Council Decision Making

Understanding of Council Decision Making graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey(external link)


Understanding of Council Decision Making (NZ Main Centres)

Understanding of Council Decision Making (NZ Main Centres) graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey(external link)


Confidence in CCC Earthquake Recovery Decision Making

Confidence in CCC Earthquake Recovery Decision Making graph

Source: CERA Wellbeing Survey(external link)

Decisions take account of community views

Community involvement in the Council's decision-making processes is an important feature of a successful local democracy. Sharing information and seeking community input at all stages of the decision-making process ensures our residents are informed and have the opportunity to be involved. This is essential to ensure our elected representatives make quality decisions on behalf of the community they represent.

Key points

  • The proportion of residents who feel they have a large or some influence on the decisions Council makes is generally increasing, reaching 42% in 2016. The proportion who feel they have small to no influence is decreasing, yet still has a greater proportion with 55% in 2016.
  • The Quality of Life Survey in 2016 indicated that 41% of Christchurch residents feel that they had some influence on Council decision-making. While this is an increase from 35% in 2012, perceptions have yet to recover to pre-quake levels of nearly 60%.
  • 14% of respondents feel that they have no influence on decisions the Council makes.
  • The desire to have more say in decision-making has increased after the earthquakes, increasing from 45% in 2010 to 53% in 2016.


Public Influence on Council Decision Making (Annual)

Public Influence on Council Decision Making (Annual) graph

Source: CCC, General Satisfaction Survey


Public Influence on Council Decision Making (Biennial)

Public Influence on Council Decision Making (Biennial) graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey(external link)


Desire to Have More Say

Desire to Have More Say graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey(external link)


More detail and information

Quality of Life Project(external link): The key purpose of the project is to provide information to decision-makers to improve the quality of life in major New Zealand urban areas.

Maori contribute to decision making

The Council, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu and the paptipu runanga are working together to develop collaborative relationships and maintain and improve participation in decision-making processes. Having Maori views considered in the Council's decision-making processes and working in partnership with Maori to make quality decisions improves the Council's ability to make decisions that are in the best interests of all our community.

Measures for this outcome are currently under development. More information will be available at a later date.

More detail and information

Encouraging (external link)Māori Participation in Local Government: (external link)The Local Government Act 2002 (the Act) contains a number of provisions that relate specifically to Māori. The Act recognises and respects the Crown’s obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi by placing some specific obligations on councils.