Good Governance is about providing leadership for the good of the community. It involves balancing views, resources and needs, and making decisions that are best for the community now and in the future.

The Council provides leadership on community issues

The leadership role of the mayor and councillors involves both decision making within the areas that council has control of, and advocacy on behalf of the community. It is imperative that the Council makes decisions that are in the best interests of both the current community as well as generations to come.

Key points

  • Just over half of Christchurch residents surveyed in 2016 were satisfied that the Council makes decisions that are in the best interests of the city, an increase from 37% in 2012.
  • According to the Quality of Life Survey, resident confidence in decision-making declined sharply in 2012, when only 32% had confidence that decisions were being made in the best interests of the city. However, confidence in decision making has been increasing since then, to 47% in 2016.
  • Confidence in Council decision-making has decreased over the past two years in other New Zealand cities. 
  • In 2016, the Quality of Life Survey identified the main reason for a lack of confidence in decision making was a general dislike for specific decisions and outcomes, with 59% of Christchurch residents indicating this. 29% of residents indicated their lack of confidence came from a general disagreement with decisions made.  The proportions for both of these reasons have increased since 2010.

Satisfaction with Decision-Making

 Satisfaction with Decision-Making graph

Source: CCC, General Satisfaction Survey


Satisfaction with Decision Making in NZ Cities

Satisfaction with Decision Making in NZ Cities graph

Source: Quality of Life Survey (external link)

Effective relationships with key partners

Collaboration and partnerships have become increasingly important as a means to bring together community skills and resources in responding to complex issues. The Council's experience in working collaboratively was particularly important following the earthquakes as people and resources were able to be quickly mobilised to meet the challenges of that time.

The Council has partnership agreements in place with Government and community agencies, including the Greater Christchurch Urban Development Strategy (external link) Implementation Committee, Regenerate Christchurch (external link) ,

 A partnership approach to improving community wellbeing will continue to grow as part of the Council's overall approach to service provision. We need to continue to grow our capability in this area and identify and foster a network of relationships.

Measures for this outcome are currently under development. More information will be available at a later date.

More detail and information

Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (external link) : The council has a close working relationship with CERA. More information about the authority and its responsibilities is available here.

Environment Canterbury (external link) : The council works closely with Environment Canterbury on a range of subjects and issues.

Greater Christchurch Urban Development Strategy (external link) : The Council is a Strategic Partner for the UDS.  More detail about the strategy and strategic partners is available here. 

Ngāi Tahu: (external link)  The council has specific responsibilities to maintain a good relationship and provide opportunities for engagement and co-operation with Māori and local Iwi.

We take opportunities to rethink the shape of the city

build on our role as one of New Zealand's largest and most vibrant cities.

Measures for this outcome are currently under development. More information will be available at a later date.

More detail and information

Christchurch Central Recovery Plan: (external link) The vision is for central Christchurch to be vibrant and well informed, to attract people to live, work, play, stay and invest. 

CERA Recovery Strategy (external link) : The Recovery Strategy for Greater Christchurch provides a vision, goals and a road map for ensuring the success of Christchurch for recovery and future leadership in earthquake resilience.

Land Use Recovery Plan:  (external link) The Land Use Recovery Plan sets a policy and planning framework necessary to: Rebuild existing communities, develop new communities, meet the land use needs of businesses, rebuild and develop the infrastructure needed to support these activities, and take account of natural hazards and environmental constraints that may affect rebuilding and recovery.

Natural Environment Recovery Programme (external link) : Environment Canterbury leads this programme to facilitate the restoration and enhancement of the natural environment, and capture opportunities to build future resilience.

 

The special position of Ngai Tahu is recognised

The Christchurch City district falls within the takiwa of Ngai Tahu, which extends over 80 per cent of Te Waipounamu. The governing body, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu, represents Ngai Tahu whanui for all purposes including protecting and advancing the collective interests and assets of the tribe. 

The Council’s Long Term Plan 2015-25 includes a statement recognising Ngai Tahu’s mana whenua status (external link) .

Measures for this outcome are currently under development. More information will be available at a later date.

More detail and information

Ngāi Tahu: (external link)  The council has specific responsibilities to maintain a good relationship and provide opportunities for engagement and co-operation with Māori and local Iwi.