Life in Christchurch is an annual survey series that asks residents for feedback on a variety of key aspects related to Life in Christchurch.

The Life in Christchurch survey series was commissioned by Christchurch City Council to gauge people’s views about aspects of life in Christchurch. 

The survey comprises a series of targeted surveys aimed at providing the Council with in-depth information on how residents feel.

The first survey’s theme had a focus on Christchurch’s central city and the results were publicly released in July 2017. The second survey focused on transport in Christchurch (including Banks Peninsula) and was undertaken in June 2017. The results for this are now available. 

The final survey for 2017 will have a focus on communities and neighbourhoods. 

For more information, please email the Monitoring and Research Team at monitor@ccc.govt.nz

2017 transport results

Results from the 2017 Life in Christchurch transport survey are now available. 

More than 4500 people responded to the survey. Although there are still some areas where improvements are required, overall people are reasonably satisfied with their travel in the city. The mode shift that can be seen towards active modes is promising, and indicates that the investment council is making in active modes is beginning to pay off.

Car travel

  • Over 90 per cent of respondents have travelled by car in the past 12 months, with 48% travelling to work by car five or more times a week and 78 per cent using their car to travel to work at least once a week.
  • More than half of respondents said they feel safe travelling by car in Christchurch, with just over 10 per cent indicating they felt unsafe. 
  • The survey revealed a third of respondents think it is difficult to travel by car in Christchurch, however a third also think it Is easy to get around. The common reason for respondents saying it difficult to get around is due to roadworks and road closures. In addition, more than 70 per cent of respondents said the availability of car parking was an issue, while 64 per cent indicated the quality of the roads was a factor.

Public transport

  • Around 30 per cent of respondents had travelled by public transport in the past 12 months, with 50 per cent reporting they had using it to travel to work at least once a week.
  • Around half of respondents think it is easy to travel by public transport in Christchurch, only 25 per cent think it is difficult while 21 per cent find it neither easy nor difficult. 
  • When asked why they thought it was difficult to travel by public transport, the majority said the routes and connections are not direct enough. Others’ indicated the service is not frequent enough, it doesn't always turn up on time, and road congestion and journey times were also factors mentioned.
  • More than half of respondents thought they may use public transport if there were more direct routes and connections, while 36 per cent indicated a more frequent service was required and 29 per cent thought a reduction in fares would help.

Cycle travel

  • Slightly more than 37 per cent of respondents had travelled by bicycle in Christchurch City in the past 12 months, with 31 per cent reporting they had travelling by bicycle more than they did 12 months ago.
  • Over the past year, 35 per cent of respondents said they had use a bicycle to get to work more than five times per week, with 32 per cent using a bicycle 2–4 times per week. 
  • A little over 45 per cent of respondents feel unsafe when travelling by bicycle in Christchurch, while 25 per cent say they feel safe. However, 77% of those who had used the Major Cycle Routes agreed that they had improved their safety from injury when travelling by bicycle.
  • More than half of respondents said it was easy to travel by bicycle in Christchurch. Only 22 per cent said they felt it was difficult to travel by bicycle, the majority of these indicated the main reasons for this viewpoint was sharing the roads with heavy vehicles, buses and cars, as well as inconsiderate and dangerous driving by other road users.

Cycleways

  • Around 70 per cent of respondents who had cycled in the past 12 months had used the new Major Cycle Routes.
  • Close to 77 per cent of those who had used the Major Cycle Routes agreed that they had improved their safety from injury when travelling by bicycle.
  • A little more than 65 per cent of respondents said separated cycleways have made it faster and more convenient to travel by bicycle, with 82 per cent saying they made it more pleasant to travel by bicycle.

Travelling with Disabilities

  • Around 6 per cent of all respondents have a long term disability that prevents them from doing everyday things that other people can do.
  • Around half of those with long term disabilities reported that it impacts on their ability to travel by bicycle all the time; 20 per cent reported that their disability has an impact on their ability to walk to activities all the time.
  • 42 per cent find that the roads and footpaths make it difficult for them to travel in the city. 
  • 32 per cent feel that public transport is hard for them to access, making it difficult for them to travel.
  • A large number of respondents with disabilities commented on the impacts that the new major cycleways infrastructure is having on their ability to travel. The raised curbs on the cycleways and around the new central bus exchange are causing difficulties for those with vision impairment in particular.

The results will help inform future planning and policy decisions as we develop Christchurch into a great place where people want to live and visit. More information about the results can be found in the full report.  [PDF, 333 KB]

More information about the questions asked can be found in the questionnaire.  [PDF, 986 KB]
[PDF, 333 KB]

 

2017 central city results

Results from the 2017 Life in Christchurch central city survey are now available. 

More than 2700 people responded to the survey. The majority of respondents reported that they had visited the central city in the past 12 months; more than half of all respondents had visited for non-work purposes. While people report feeling frustrated about transport issues, they are still visiting the central city.

Living in the central city

  • Only six per cent of respondents were living in the central city but another 2 per cent were actively looking to move into the area.
  • Eleven per cent said they planned to move into the central city in the next year or two. Another 17 per cent said they would consider a move into the central city once the rebuild was complete.
  • A further 15 per cent said they would consider living in the central city once their children had left home.
  • One of the main concerns people had about a move to the central city was the lack of affordable housing options.

 The range of services and facilities in the central city

  • Around 65 per cent thought there was a range of things in the central city for families to do and more than 80 per cent agreed there was a range of restaurants, cafes and bars.

Central city environment and identity

  • The survey revealed residents see the Botanic Gardens, Hagley Park and the Margaret Mahy Family Playground as the key things that make the central city distinct and unique.
  • Quizzed about other aspects of the central city, around half of respondents said they were satisfied with the look and feel of the streetscapes and open spaces while 63 per cent said they were satisfied with the look and feel of the new buildings.
  • Around half of respondents think that the central city provides a safe environment for pedestrians. However, only 30 per cent think that it is safe for cyclists.

Safety

  • A little over 90 per cent of respondents said they felt safe in the central city during the day. Common reasons why people did not feel safe were anti-social behaviour and people under the influence of drugs and alcohol.

 Transport

  • Close to 65 per cent of respondents who had travelled to the city centre in the past 12 months did not think it was easy to get there by car, largely due to road works and road closures.
  • Close to 20 per cent of respondents reported travelling to the central city by bike for work related trips.

The results will help inform future planning and policy decisions as we develop Christchurch into a great place where people want to live and visit. More information about the results can be found in the full report. [PDF, 365 KB]

More information about the questions asked can be found in the questionnaire [PDF, 436 KB]

2016 Life in Christchurch results

Results from Life in Christchurch 2016 are now available. More than 3000 residents from the city and areas surrounding the city completed the survey over a four week period in June this year.

The results provide a good insight into resident’s behaviours, their sense of belonging and their views about a range of aspects of their neighbourhoods and the city in the midst of the rebuild.

Key findings

  • A surprising number of respondents (45%) had participated in Council decision making in the last 12 months; around 20% of respondents reported that they are dissatisfied with the opportunities provided to participate in decision making.
  • Around 30% of respondents are satisfied with the recreation, shopping and socialising opportunities available in the central city; around the same number reported that they are not satisfied. 
  • Of those respondents who reported that they travel by car, 60% agreed that it was easy to travel around the city via car. Cyclists and public transport users were more divided with almost as many disagreeing that it was easy to cycle as those who feel it is easy to cycle around the city. However, generally most respondents agreed that it is easy to walk places in the city. 
  • More than 70% of respondents still believe that the garden city image is an important component of Christchurch’s identity. Hagley Park, the Port Hills and the Botanic gardens all rated highly as features that contribute to making Christchurch a distinctive and unique city.
  • When asked to provide one word that describes Christchurch, “Home” was the word most commonly provided by respondents.
  • More than 80% of respondents agreed that they enjoy living in their neighbourhood; neighbourhood parks and green spaces were the main reason cited. Less than 10% of respondents disagreed that they enjoy living in their neighbourhood, however for those that did, crime and safety issues were the most common reason reported.
  • More than 90% of respondents agreed that it is important that the Council continues to work to protect and enhance indigenous biodiversity in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula. 

The results will help inform future planning and policy decisions as we develop Christchurch into a great place where people want to live and visit. More information about the results can be found in the full report [PDF, 5.7 MB].

A range of posters [PDF, 8.1 MB] that summarise the 2016 results are available.