A better understanding of all the dimensions of natural hazard risk is needed to help the community plan for the future.

What this means

A better understanding of all the dimensions of natural hazard risk is needed to help the community plan for the future. Effective governance supports collaboration and partnership at local, regional and national levels to take ownership of natural hazard risk work.  Risk reduction and robust disaster preparedness will enhance the economic, social health and cultural resilience of our communities.

How we will get there

Complete work to better understand the risks we face, including the Living with Water Programme; Land Drainage Recovery Programme (LDRP); working group on geospatial information for emergency management; and AF8 reviews.

Strengthen risk governance including through the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Group, Global Covenant of Mayors and Living with Water programmes.

Invest in disaster risk reduction for resilience, particularly through the LDRP.

Enhance disaster preparedness for effective response and to build back better, particularly through civil defence emergency management (CDEM) community resilience and public education, and emergency operations centre (EOC) training and exercises.

How we are doing 

Risk assessment of Council infrastructureNot enough information or no information available

No information collected for this indicator yet

Residents level of preparedness for emergenciesSnapshotOnly

Eighty seven percent of Christchurch residents have enough food for three days, 74 percent have secured heavy household items that might fall, and 70 percent have three days of water at their homes in case of an emergency (2018). 

Just over half of residents have an up to date emergency plan.