People feel a greater sense of belonging and pride in their city when they feel their culture and heritage is celebrated.

Arts, culture, heritage, and sport play an important role in the life of the city. They benefit both residents and visitors. It is essential that links with the past are identified and conserved as the city continues to grow and its built environment changes.

As tangata whenua, Ngāi Tahu have rich cultural associations with many places and resources in the district, including settlements, transport routes, gardens, urupā (burial grounds), and places of importance for mahinga kai (food and resources).

What this means for our district

  • The city's heritage and taonga are conserved for future generations.
  • Arts and culture thrive in the city.
  • Sites and places of cultural significance to tangata whenua are respected and preserved.
  • Cultural and ethnic diversity is valued and celebrated.

How we are contributing

We support various cultural and sporting events throughout the district. A Multi Cultural Strategy – Our Future Together has been developed to help guide Council and the community towards achieving a diverse, inclusive and welcoming city. We are currently working with the community to develop a new comprehensive Heritage Strategy to ensure our culture and heritage are preserved and valued. 

How you can help

Take your friends and whānau along to arts and cultural events. Get involved with a sports club. Learn about your local neighbourhood's history and heritage, including any sites and places of cultural significance to tangata whenua.

How we are doing

Status What do we want to achieve? What has happened?
Negative result
NegativeResult

Importance of protecting heritage in the city

62% of respondents to the Life in Christchurch survey in 2016 felt more should be done to support and protect the heritage in Christchurch. Further information.

Positive result
PositiveResult

Culturally rich and diverse arts scene

The proportion of people who feel Christchurch has a rich and diverse arts scene has increased from 47% in 2012 to 53% in 2018.  Further information.

Mixed result
Indeterminate Result

Attitudes to diversity

Over the past 10 years, around 60% of people felt increased diversity made Christchurch a better or much better place. 

However, the proportion of people who think it has a negative impact has grown from 5–12%. Further information.

Importance of protecting heritage in the city

Sixty two per cent of respondents to the Life in Christchurch survey in 2016 felt more should be done to support and protect heritage in Christchurch, while a quarter of respondents felt the current level of support and protections was sufficient. Nine per cent thought there should be less effort put into supporting or protecting heritage.

Culturally rich and diverse arts scene

In both 2012 and 2014, 47% of Christchurch respondents to the Quality of Life survey felt that Christchurch had a rich and diverse arts scene. This was very similar to other how respondents in other cities viewed their local arts scene.

In 2016, there was a large increase locally and nationally in those who felt their city had a rich and diverse arts scene. Christchurch increased from 47–60%, while nationally this proportion increased from 45–66%.

2018 saw a return to similar levels of sentiment seen in 2012 and 2014. In Christchurch, 53% of respondents felt the city had a rich and diverse arts scene, while nationally this figure was 40%.

Attitudes to diversity

Over the past 10 years, around 60% of respondents to the Quality of Life survey felt Christchurch was a better or much better place as a result of a more culturally diverse population. This was 64% in 2018, the highest in the time series dating back to 2002. The national average in 2018 was 57% (in regards to respondents' local city). 

However, since 2008 the proportion who believe it has made Christchurch a worse or much worse place has increased from 5% in 2008 to 12% in 2018.  Most of this growth has shifted from those who previously reported increased diversity made no difference to the City, which has been declining since 2004.