The natural environment is important to residents and a drawcard for visitors.

Urban growth, agricultural activities, and exotic/pest species have reduced indigenous biodiversity. It is important that the Council is proactive in working with the community to protect our unique landscapes and biodiversity.

What this means for our district

  • Indigenous biodiversity and ecosystems are protected
  • Significant landscapes and natural features are enhanced
  • The range of indigenous habitats and species we have are improved
  • People feel a connection with, and responsibility towards the natural environment

How we are contributing

We are working on initiatives to support landowners protect and enhance biodiversity on private land. We also have an environmental programme which helps to protect Council-owned land and promotes revegetation efforts.

How you can help

Try planting indigenous plants in your garden which support native birds and biodiversity. Consider the impact of planting introduced species at home, as some can quickly spread to other areas. Volunteer for a conservation group or join a Council or community planting day(external link).

How we are doing

Status What do we want to achieve? What has happened?
Positive result
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QE 2 covenants

Since 1985, a total of 965 hectares of private land has been covenanted, averaging 28 hectares annually. Further information.

Snapshot

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State of native bush, forests, nature reserves and open space

In 2016, over 58 per cent of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the state of native bush, forests, nature reserves and open space in the city. Further information.

Snapshot

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State of the lakes, rivers, harbours, and coastlines

62 per cent of respondents were satisfied with the condition of the city's coastlines, whereas 45 per cent of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the state of the city's harbours.

However, only a quarter of respondents were satisfied with the state of the city's rivers in 2016. Further information.

Negative result
NegativeResult
Satisfaction with condition of waterways Satisfaction with the condition of the city's rivers, streams and waterways has declined from 75 per cent in 2006 to around 50 per cent since 2013. Further information.

QEII national trust covenants

Since 1985, almost 1000 hectares of private land within Christchurch City has been covenanted with the QEII National Trust(external link) to protect the habitat of threatened animal and plant species in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula.

Protected land ranges in size from 1000 square metres to 77 hectares. On average, 28 hectares of land is covenanted each year.

State of native bush, forests, nature reserves and open space

The Council's 2016 Life in Christchurch survey found over 58 per cent of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the state of native bush, forests, nature reserves and open space in the city. Fewer than 10 per cent of the population were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the state of these environments.

A higher proportion of respondents were satisfied with the state of open space, with 72 per cent, than the other environments.

Respondents were less likely to know about the state or hadn't visited areas of native bush, forest or nature reserves, compared with open space.

State of the lakes, rivers, harbours, and coastlines

The Council's 2016 Life in Christchurch survey found lower levels of  satisfaction with the state of the city's rivers, harbours and coastlines, compared to the areas of native bush and open space referred to above.

Coastlines have the highest level of satisfaction at 62 per cent, whereas 45 per cent of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the state of the city's harbours, and only a quarter of respondents were satisfied with the state of the city's rivers.

Around half (51 per cent) of respondent were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the state of the city's rivers.

Satisfaction with condition of waterways

Resident satisfaction with the condition of the city's rivers, streams and waterways has been declining since the mid 2000s, when around 75 per cent of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their condition.

In 2015, satisfaction with the condition of the city's waterways dropped to 46 per cent, but has since returned to just over 50 per cent.

The level of dissatisfaction has been increasing over this time, with fewer than 10 per cent of residents dissatisfied in 2005 and 2006. Since 2016, over 30 per cent of respondents have been dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the condition of the city's rivers, streams and waterways.