The Council's Long Term Plan considered how to recognise and provide for the needs of this expanding, diverse and changing community. The plan provides for a new aquatic facility, a new library and service centre for the southwest.

Project status: Decision made
Open for feedback: 26th April 2017 - 9th June 2017
26 Apr 2017

Opportunity to comment on the New Hornby Library and Customer Services, and the South West Leisure Centre has now closed.

We received 293 submissions during the consultation period. 

A report will be presented to the Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board for a recommendation to Council at the Community Board meeting of Saturday 12 August 2017.  The agenda will be available on the Council website from 5pm, Wednesday 9 August 2017.

Comments received

Consultation Summary Report [PDF, 1.1 MB]

Question 1 - co-location option feedback [PDF, 637 KB]

Question 1 - separated option feedback [PDF, 369 KB]

Question 1 - no option selected feedback [PDF, 208 KB]

Question 2 - Facilities use feedback [PDF, 451 KB]

Question 4 - General comments [PDF, 560 KB]

Submission #2550 [PDF, 622 KB]

Submission #2481 [PDF, 904 KB]

Attachment to submission #2657 [PDF, 7.4 MB]


 

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Why do we need a New Hornby Library and Customer Services, and South West Leisure Centre?

Christchurch has experienced significant population growth within the southwest area and this is expected to continue.

The 2009 South West Christchurch Area Plan established a 35-year framework for development of residential and industrial land. Development is already underway, and by 2044 this area is expected to accommodate more than 12,000 new homes and more than 200 hectares of new industrial land.

The Council's Long Term Plan considered how to recognise and provide for the needs of this expanding, diverse and changing community. This included planning for good access to community facilities and services, and the Plan anticipated the provision of a new aquatic facility, a new library and a new service centre for the southwest.


Library

The current Hornby Library in Goulding Avenue is an older facility that is no longer fit for purpose in Christchurch’s new 21st century library service. It also suffers from a lack of visibility, with many Hornby residents unaware of its location and existence. Libraries are most effective when in the heart of communities, enabling great community connections and opportunities for customers to enjoy Council and community amenities in one easy-to-access place.

The proposed new facility’s Library will support the strategic goals of the Libraries and Information Unit to ‘Empower Christchurch to Discover, Connect and Play’ by:

  • Creating a sense of place for the community – a welcoming library facility which encourages meeting and community connection.
  • Providing ready access to electronic resources and content, e-books, e-magazines, free Wi-Fi and the riches of the internet in the digital age.
  • Providing community intergenerational programmes, learning and events.
  • Providing skilled staff to offer library and other Council services.
  • Offering ready access to integrated Council customer services and community partnerships where appropriate.

Our 21st century libraries are modern, open and welcoming spaces that provide a wide range of activities and experiences for all people. Through integrating Council customer services and other recreational activities, a modern Hornby library will be a valued community asset which will give people a sense of ownership and pride.


Customer Services

Customer Services provide broader Council services i.e. paying rates, registering dogs, etc. There is currently a limited service available in the Hornby Library building. By incorporating Customer Services within a dedicated community hub, we’re offering a better experience for the local community – maintaining multiple, joined-up services efficiently at one location, with increased hours. For our customers and community this will mean assisted or self-service options, and a one-stop shop for all their needs.


Leisure

Through better leisure facilities, we’re encouraging more people to be more active more often. Facilities like our pools and gyms improve quality of life across Christchurch, helping build strong communities, promote personal health and wellbeing, and develop lifelong physical and social skills.

Great recreation and sport facilities and the services they provide can act as a stimulus for the local economy and attract families to the community.

New facilities offering these services in Christchurch’s southwest will achieve the following community outcomes:

  • Give people equitable access to parks, open spaces, recreation facilities, libraries and Council services.
  • Increase participation in recreation, sporting and community activities.
  • Ensure Christchurch is recognised as a great place to work, live, visit, invest and do business.
  • Enhance the services that are available locally within the urban areas.
  • Create an easy-to-access “heart” of the community that’s available to everyone.

The facilities will be easily accessible, enhancing and reflecting their location in the South West community and surrounding environment. Any future facility will be designed using best practice principles, ensuring environmentally responsible construction and efficient ongoing maintenance.


Council's Long Term Plan 2015-2025

In collaboration with the local community, Christchurch City Council identified a gap within the southwest area and set aside money in their Long Term Plan 2015–25 for:

New Hornby Library and Service Centre Community Facilities South West Leisure Centre
$12.9 million $22.3 million

The project fulfils all five of the Council’s Community Outcomes – what the Council aims to achieve in meeting the current and future needs of our communities for good quality local infrastructure, local public services, and regulatory functions. 

The Community Outcomes set the direction for the Council's Long Term Plan and its other key strategy and planning documents. These are:

  • Strong Communities
  • Liveable City
  • Healthy Environment
  • Prosperous Economy
  • Good Governance

Citizen Hub Strategy

Customers increasingly expect joined-up services, easy one-stop transactions, and channel choice in how they engage with the Council. The Citizen Hub Strategy has been developed in order to deliver a better experience for Christchurch citizens at all of our service facilities.

A hub can be far more than a place from which service is delivered: the key is integration. There is a worldwide trend towards establishing community hubs – and the Council has already begun to adopt this concept with the development of our first co-located services in Papanui, Shirley, Fendalton, South Library and most recently at Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre.


Hornby Project Timeline


We need your feedback

Location

At present, three locations have been shortlisted that meet the criteria:

  • Denton Park (Main South Road) – 71,230m2
  • Kyle Park (Waterloo Road) – 87,201m2
  • Warren Park (Oakley Crescent) – 155,296m2

You can suggest other possible sites on the feedback form.

Facilities use

How would you use the library, customer service and pool/fitness facilities?

Co-located or separate facilities?

Depending on the community’s response, these Council services could be co-located on one site, or separated and located at two different sites. Once a decision on the location(s) is made, the design of the facilities can get underway.

  • Co-located facility
    Christchurch City Council is moving towards grouping wider ranges of services together in convenient locations – by combining libraries, recreation and sport, customer services and community spaces together we can provide a one-stop-shop. Our conversations with the community have led us to this approach. Hubs like these aren’t just highly convenient for local residents – they also mean efficiency, less duplication and cost savings on the Council’s part. Our spatial analysis studies and high-level estimates tell us we achieve more with the same money through adopting these hubbing strategies.
  • Separate facilities
    If services were to be provided separately, they would operate entirely independently at the two different sites. This may offer some benefits by sharing services throughout communities. However, separate facilities are less efficient in terms of less space, higher ongoing costs and unnecessary duplication – for the same price, about 10–15 per cent more floor area can be provided within a single co-located building, and over time the cost of operating a single co-located building is lower by about $150,000 per year.

Site selection

The Council assessed a number of locations across the Hornby, Sockburn and Wigram areas, looking at their attributes and external influences. Consideration was also given to what the ‘ideal site’ might look like.

These assessments resulted in a shortlist of three sites: 

  • Denton Park (Main South Road) – 71,230m2
  • Kyle Park (Waterloo Road) – 87,201m2
  • Warren Park (Oakley Crescent) – 155,296m2.

Assessing the options

A number of factors and criteria can determine the best location for any new facility, although often a site will offer both strengths and challenges. These criteria include:

  • Access and transport 
    Proximity to public transport, arterial roads and car parking, with sufficient and safe pedestrian and active transport links. This enables equitable access to all members of the community, including children or those of limited means.
  • Citizen proximity
    The facilities are close to higher-density residential suburbs, where future growth is expected, and will also serve a wide catchment area. The development would complement the existing networks, and minimise vehicle traffic.
  • Profile and sustainability 
    Higher-profile sites with good visibility are more likely to encourage single trip/multi-use activity. The proximity to a Key Activity Centre or other major destination will be a main attribute. This enhances long-term commercial viability, as well as active and connected communities.
  • Planning and availability
    Supports the future growth of the city and is compatible with existing or proposed services. Availability of the site, disruption to existing users, and cost to develop the facilities, including infrastructure and ground conditions, affects what can be provided back to the community. Aligns closely with best practice and the District Plan and South West Area Plan (SWAP).

Location

Site zone and travel links

site zone and travel links

Denton Park

Denton Park MapSite description

The site of Denton Park is open and predominantly flat, with mature and semi-mature trees around most of the perimeter of the park and around Denton Oval. The site is a relatively simple rectangular shape with a single street frontage to Main South Road. Its total area is approximately 71,230 square metres (including Denton Oval).

Vehicle access and car parking is located around the park edge accessed from Main South Road and Chalmers Street. In addition to access from these two streets, pedestrian and cycle access is also from Kathleen Crescent to the west of the park.

Denton Oval is a key feature of the site, but it also contains sports fields and batting nets, sport clubrooms and a Council water pump station.

Denton Park is bounded by the southern railway line to the north, with Kyle Park located further to the north again. Denton Park is linked to Kyle Park, which is located to the north of the railway line, by a pedestrian underpass beneath the railway line, which is a significant barrier to the level of connection between the parks.

The Hornby commercial centre is located to the east of Denton Park. The commercial centre provides a wide range of retail, commercial and service activities as well as access to public transport. The interface between the park and commercial centre is comprised of car parking, which dominates this eastern edge, business servicing, fencing and the rear side of commercial development blocks. The pedestrian access leading to Kyle Park is also located on the eastern boundary.

To the west of the park is a suburban residential neighbourhood, comprising predominantly single storey housing accessed from Kathleen Crescent. This area was recently rezoned from a Residential Suburban to Residential Medium Density zone, with future increases in housing density anticipated within this area. The park’s western boundary primarily comprises high, close-boarded fences where houses back on to the park, with tree and shrub planting located on the park edge. Main South Road forms the southern boundary to the site.

Within 10 minutes' walking distance is a large suburban residential catchment – including opportunity for further residential development, existing and proposed cycle routes, industrial and commercial uses and a range of smaller community-based uses such as parks.

Site strengths

  • Provides an ideal opportunity to create a civic heart to the community it serves, supporting the existing extensive range of commercial, industrial and community activities within the vicinity.
  • Provides an opportunity for a great outlook for a new facility and integration with existing park users.
  • Ideally located with links to the bus interchange, a proposed major cycleway and established pedestrian routes. It is also located near schools, retail, healthcare and cultural activity centres, creating opportunities for multi-purpose trips.
  • The site provides high-profile visibility and significant passing traffic on Main South Road, and could provide ease of access for visitors. This may increase membership and community participation levels, becoming a strong asset to the whole community.
  • There is sufficient land area for a combined facility, supporting the Council’s move towards providing community hubs.
  • The land is already Council-owned, freeing up money for investment in the facilities.
  • Favourable ground conditions are expected (subject to detailed investigations).
  • May provide opportunities to upgrade the existing sports fields, thereby enabling higher usage rates (particularly through the winter seasons), and promote better utilisation rates of both Denton and Kyle Parks. Offers high compatibility with existing usages and offers the potential to create new partnerships.
  • Provides an opportunity to increase the quality and safety of the area, particularly for pedestrians and cyclists, through development.

Site challenges

  • This area is already a busy hub. The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) has a specific interest as the current access to Denton Park is provided via State Highway 1 (a high-volume national road). The project will need to ensure access is not constrained nd/or overburdened. This may require further changes to the site, including new primary or secondary accesses being formed, along with limiting the potential for U-turns on the state highway.
  • Existing car parking is limited and at capacity. The proposed activities would provide an approximate 150–200 additional car park spaces for the area, with the potential for further overflow parking. This may be provided via a number of solutions – distributing parking spaces around the site to leave more room for sports fields, as well as providing cycle, pedestrian and public transport connections and facilities.
  • The likely impacts are the loss of one rugby field and some amenity to the park which would reduce the current cricketing boundaries. This may also affect the old scout hall, which is currently used by Kyokushin Karate. However there are opportunities to improve the facilities on Denton and Kyle parks and to accommodate any displaced sports activity within the immediate area.
  • The cost of improving Denton and Kyle parks, or other spaces, to accommodate any displaced sports users.
  • Denton Park suffers from elevated rates of crime and some areas have poor visibility, particularly the underpass through to Kyle Park. Although this is a challenge, the project provides an opportunity to improve and mitigate these issues and would also potentially improve the approaches to the underpass.
  • The perimeter of Denton Park can be hard to get to, with adjacent features (Main South Road, the railway line, vehicle parking and the neighbouring development). The visual recognition of Denton within the wider neighbourhood is relatively low, with the exception of visibility from Main South Road. However, the proposal provides an opportunity to address these issues more generally.
  • About 8000 square metres (11 per cent) of Denton Park currently used for outdoor recreation purposes would instead be used as a space for the facility and associated parking.
  • The proposed use of this part of Denton Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (recreation reserve), and the Denton Park Management Plan 1987. Building the facility will require a change of reserve classification for Denton Park to Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve, and a change to the Management Plan.

Kyle Park

Kyle Park mapSite description

The site of Kyle Park is irregular in shape – a narrow wedge shape, with both flat and hilly areas. The park contains a wetland, BMX track, open flat areas and landscaped areas with mature and semi-mature trees. There is no formalised vehicle access within the site, but there are a series of pedestrian and cycle connections to and through the site. The park has an extensive street frontage which is open to Waterloo Road and allows a high degree of visibility into the park. The total area is approximately 87,201 square metres (including BMX track and retention basin).

Waterloo Road forms the northwest boundary of the site. Hornby Primary School, Hornby High School and a residential area are immediately to the north-northwest of Waterloo Road. The school fronts onto Waterloo Road, as do the residential properties. The residential area was recently rezoned from a Residential Suburban zone to Residential Medium Density zone, with future increases in housing density anticipated.

The industrial area on Smarts Road comprises the eastern boundary of Kyle Park, with the front generally comprising close-boarded fences and landscaping. The railway is also located to the south, dividing Kyle from Denton Park, with the only connection between the parks being the underpass beneath the railway line.

The Hornby commercial centre is also located to the south of Kyle Park. The commercial centre provides a wide range of retail, commercial and service activities as well access to public transport. However, the railway line means there is no safe, direct connection from the commercial centre to Kyle Park. The interface between the park and commercial centre is comprised of fencing, car parking, businesses and large retail stores.

Site strengths

  • Kyle Park would offer a facility within good general proximity to the Hornby community and will offer opportunity for reasonable outlook and integration with surrounding activities including the schools and park.
  • Its location is on the route of a proposed major cycleway, and it currently offers pedestrian access via the underpass to Denton Park to the bus interchange. The site is also located near schools, retail, healthcare and cultural activity centres, creating opportunities for multi-purpose trips.
  • The site has reasonable visibility and passing traffic, and can provide relative ease of access for visitors despite constraints such as the railway. It may promote membership and community participation levels.
  • Kyle Park is within an area identified for an increase in residential density, supporting increased community activity within the area. An extensive and open street frontage to the site allows for clear visibility, and the opportunity to provide an environment with good views.
  • There is sufficient land area for a combined facility, supporting the Council’s move towards providing community hubs.
  • The land is already Council-owned, freeing up money for investment in the facilities.
  • May provide opportunities to upgrade the existing sports fields. This will enable higher usage rates (particularly through the winter seasons) and promote better use of both Denton and Kyle parks, and the potential to create new partnerships.

Site challenges

  • Kyle Park has poor ground conditions and is a contaminated site due to previous landfill activities.
  • A significant amount of the budget would be required for ground remediation. This extra cost means that the size of any facility at this location would be substantially smaller by up to 25 per cent (or 1000 square metres), resulting in the community receiving far less at this location.
  • This area of Hornby is already an extremely busy hub. NZTA has a specific interest due to the proximity to State Highway 1 (a high volume national road) and the junction with Waterloo Road. The extra traffic generated by the facility would add to congestion when school is starting and finishing. Site access would need to be considered, as would any work required along Waterloo Road to slow traffic. Pedestrian facilities would be required and the intersection of Gilberthorpes/Moffett/Parker/Waterloo may need to be reviewed.
  • Kyle Park is not directly connected to the Hornby Hub, and any facility located on Kyle will not contribute to the development of a “Civic Heart” for Hornby. If anything, it may dilute the heart by spreading facilities. Kyle has a boundary with a rail line and light commercial area, which is not optimal.
  • Existing car parking is limited and at capacity. The proposed activities would provide an approximate 150–200 additional car park spaces for the area, with the potential for further overflow parking. This may be provided via a number of solutions – distributing parking spaces around the site to leave more room for sports fields, as well as providing cycle, pedestrian and public transport connections and facilities. Access to public transport facilities is less direct, safe and accessible than that of Denton Park.
  • The likely impacts are the loss of one lower-grade cricket field and one football field. Council staff would work with any affected stakeholders to try and find the best solutions for them. There are opportunities to accommodate any displaced sports locally.
  • Kyle Park suffers from elevated rates of crime and some areas have poor visibility, particularly the underpass through to Denton Park. Although this is a challenge, the project provides an opportunity to improve and mitigate these issues and would also potentially improve the approaches to the underpass.
  • About 8000 square metres (nine per cent) of Kyle Park currently used for outdoor recreation purposes would instead be used as a space for the facility and associated parking.
  • The proposed use of the majority part (Lot 1 DP 25716) of Kyle Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (recreation reserve). The minority part (Lot 2 DP 34558) of Kyle Park is inconsistent with its current status as recreation reserve (however, may not be classified as such). It is also inconsistent with the Management Plan 1993 (as an attractive and hospitable suburban park, primarily for active recreation of various types, with cycle and pedestrian through routes to be managed as a recreational open space for use as an area for organised outdoor sport). Therefore, changing the use of parts of Kyle Park will require a change of reserve classification (to Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan.
  • Part of Kyle Park is subject to an operative lease to a BMX club.

Warren Park

Warren Park MapSite description

Warren Park is open and mainly flat, with a combination of shelter belt-style planting, and mature and semi-mature trees around most of the perimeter. Sports fields largely used for football and cricket take up most of the park. The total area is approximately 155,296 square metres.

The site is triangular in shape with an open street frontage to Oakley Crescent, an established suburban residential street, and Wilmers Road, which is semi-rural/industrial in nature. Shelter belt planting runs along Wilmers Road to the outheast of the site. Close boarded fences are located on the northwest boundary where houses back onto the park.

Pedestrian access is mainly off Oakley Crescent, with a narrow pedestrian connection to Springs Road to the northwest. The street layout, and lack of destinations in the area, mean pedestrian and cycle use is variable. Public transport routes are located on Springs and Awatea roads. Although these are a short walk from Warren Park, the quality of the Springs Road pedestrian access is low.

There is car parking on the frontage with Oakley Crescent, close to the playground.

Warren Park has industrial zoning on two sides to the southwest and southeast, with some of this land currently still rural. The remainder of the area surrounding Warren Park is made up of existing or proposed residential development, including Wigram Skies to the northeast and Awatea to the east.

Aside from the industrial and residential activity, there is little else in terms of retail, service or community activity within the area, including within a 10 minute walking distance of Warren Park.

Site strengths

  • There is an overall perception of lower vehicle congestion around this site. However Springs Road at the Amyes/Awatea roads intersection is becoming increasingly busy and will come under consideration for traffic lights in time. Volumes on all these roads is growing, in part due to the residential growth in the area along with the Selwyn District.
  • The site benefits from passing traffic and a major road in close proximity, however lacks a strong visual presence from the street.
  • There is sufficient land area for a combined facility, supporting the Council’s move towards providing community hubs.
  • The land is already Council-owned, freeing up money for investment in the facilities.
  • May provide opportunities to upgrade the existing sports fields. This will enable higher usage rates (particularly through the winter seasons) and promote better use of Warren Park, and the potential to create new partnerships.
  • Provides an opportunity to increase community-based activity and services within that area.
  • The site is open to the adjacent residential development, with a good length of street frontage.

Site challenges

  • The site offers restricted connectivity for those without a vehicle and will therefore not provide equitable access to all citizens, particularly children or those people with limited means to independently access the facilities.
  • Public transport is available from Awatea and Springs roads. However, further direct pedestrian connections and associated bus facilities would be required. Further investment would also be required to improve pedestrian and active transport connections which may reduce the money available for the building.
  • The site is outside any identified key activity centre and would not support multi-purpose trips for user groups and does not contribute to the development of a "Civic Heart". If anything, it will dilute the heart by spreading facilities.
  • The site offers poor accessibility to the core service areas of Hei Hei and Masham. The site is just five kilometres from Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre (which includes a library, customer service and outdoor pool).
  • NZTA may have some interest due to the connections to State Highway 76 and the junction with Springs Road, however this road is likely to come under local authority control once the southern arterial is completed, so this is of a lesser concern.
  • Car movements within the area could increase due to the placement of a large facility on the very southern fringe.
  • Subject to the design of the facility, one or two football fields could be lost. This may also affect seasonal cricket. Council staff would work with any affected stakeholders to try and find the best solutions for them. There are opportunities to accommodate any displaced sports locally.
  • Warren Park presently experiences low levels of crime and antisocial behaviour, as do the surrounding properties. Minor graffiti and some fly-tipping is evident on Wilmers Road. Opportunities could be taken to improve and mitigate these issues within the project planning and design phases.
  • About 8000 square metres (five per cent) of Warren Park currently used for outdoor recreation purposes would instead be used as a space for the facility and associated car parking
  • The proposed use of part of Warren Park is inconsistent with the current reserve classification (recreation reserve), and the Management Plan 1986 (to be principally used for active team sports but also for casual and passive recreational activities). Therefore, to facilitate the proposed change of use of part of Warren Park will require a change of reserve classification (to Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve) and a change to the Management Plan.

 

Other possible locations

Other possible locations

Is there another possible location we have missed that could meet the criteria and give the community a fantastic facility? If so, please have your say on the response form.

The table that follows summarises several sites that were assessed but didn’t make it onto the shortlist.

Site Summary

South Hornby School site
(53 Shands Road) - School due to relocate in 2017

  • Site lacks profile and street frontage. This would be a drawback in particular for the Library and Customer Services components of the facility, and would be a constraint for vehicle access to the facility. May require additional purchases to create a wider access and to address objections and concerns from residents.
  • Site is significantly larger than what is required at approximately 27,624 square metres. 
  • Public transport links are poor (no bus routes pass the site, and the site is more than 800 metres from the Hornby suburban interchange).
  • Would necessitate a land acquisition (likelihood land subject to offer backs), potentially impacting the project timing. The Council may be required to purchase more land than is required, potentially impacting the type of facility that could be delivered.

Main South Road properties
(adjacent to Denton Park)

  • Good profile site and in close proximity to the recently zoned residential medium density housing area.
  • Would require the purchase of residential medium-density zoned private land (approximately 10,000 square metres) from multiple landowners. Availability of this land and confirmed costs are yet to be fully determined.
  • Public transport links generally good (two bus routes, and within 400 metres of the Hornby suburban interchange).
  • Would necessitate a land acquisition, potentially impacting the project timing and the type of facility that could be delivered.

Hornby Library – current site
(Goulding Avenue)

  •  Lower profile site but still within the Hornby key activity centre area.
  • Site size is too small at approximately 1280 square metres and development would require early demolition of the existing library to make room for any new build.
  • Public transport links generally good (one bus route, and within 400 metres of the Hornby suburban interchange).
  • Would necessitate the acquisition from multiple land owners of approximately 8000 square metres of residential suburban density transition zoned private land.
 

Waterloo Park
(Islington Square)

  • Lower profile location that, compared with other site options, is further away from some key user groups and the focus of activity in Hornby.
  • Public transport links are currently marginal (close to the Templeton (Y) bus route).
  • Would necessitate land acquisitions of approximately 10,000 square metres within the proposed mixed use development area (offices, retail and entertainment).
 

Wigram Skies
(various)

  • Potential for good street frontage and profile within the Wigram neighbourhood centre.
  • Public transport links generally good (two bus routes).
  • Closer proximity to Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre (four kilometres) compared to other site options.
  • Would necessitate land acquisitions of approximately 10,000 square metres, for which there is not sufficient undeveloped supply within the commercial zoned neighbourhood centre. This option may require the acquisition of residential zoned land and associated planning processes.
Sockburn Park 

  • Fair profile but relatively poor outlook onto Main South Road. A deep site relative to site-width limits the street frontage options.
  • Public transport links generally good (two bus routes).
  • Proximity to Upper Riccarton Library is less than 700 metres.
  • Located next to a small local centre only. The nearest neighbourhood centre or key activity centre is more than one kilometre.
  • Site compromised by poor ground condition, probable contamination and overhead electrical pylons.

Sockburn School site (18 Springs Road) - School due to relocate in 2018 to Wigram

  • Lower profile site with some frontage onto Main South Road (with a longer street frontage on Springs Road). The site is well known as the current location of Sockburn School.
  • Site is significantly larger than required at approximately 34,590 square metres.
  • Public transport links generally good (three bus routes).
  • Close proximity to Upper Riccarton Library (less than two kilometres).
  • Would necessitate a land acquisition (likelihood land subject to offer backs), potentially impacting the project timing. The Council may be required to purchase more land than is required, potentially impacting the type of facility that could be delivered.

Old Sockburn Service Centre
(149 Main South Road)

  • High profile site at the intersection of two busy roads and well known as the location of the former service centre. However, the site is relatively isolated from other activities. Busy and wide roads flanking the site are significant barriers to both walking and cycling, particularly for access from the south and west.
  • Public transport links generally good (with bus routes along Main South and Blenheim roads).
  • Less than 800 metres from Upper Riccarton Library.
  • Located next to a small local centre only. More than one kilometre from the nearest neighbourhood centre or key activity centre.
  • Site currently controlled by the Council but is Crown-derived land. Would involve the demolition of existing structures.

Co-located or separate facilities?

Consideration has been given to whether to co-locate (combine) the services in one facility, or to build separate facilities. This decision will guide the budget, timeframes and overall design.

Co-located facility

A co-located facility would offer a number of benefits by reducing the costs to the Council, both now and over time. These include:

Capital Expenditure estimated savings of $2.5 million

  • Reduces horizontal infrastructure requirements (water, waste, power, and telecommunications)
  • Spatial efficiencies (shared common spaces)
  • Savings on plant, equipment and building services (transformer sizing, mechanical ventilation and heating, fire, data and security)
  • One Building Management System (BMS), with opportunities to improve overall building performance
  • Savings on construction costs (efficiencies with Preliminaries and General costs, supervision and professional service fees). Operational Expenditure estimated savings of $150,000 per year
  • Reduced power consumption
  • Staffing efficiencies (shared service receptions)
  • Security and monitoring costs
  • Shared asset management and overheads
  • Annual maintenance reductions (a more efficient building envelope)
  • Improved Cost of Consumption (CoC) over time.

Co-location makes the most of the potential for community interaction, allowing the sharing of knowledge or ideas for mutual enrichment which can actively strengthen communities, creating an integrated civic heart and one-stop shop.

It also provides the opportunity for single-destination multipurpose trips to occur, which reduces overall traffic movements and maximises overall participation rates and long-term financial viability.

The facilities listed below could be included within a co-located facility:

Library, Customer Service and Leisure facility

  • Library
  • Customer services
  • Community meeting rooms (including space for Community Board meetings)
  • Staff areas
  • Aquatic
  • Fitness.

Note: co-located facilities would allow for more amenities to be delivered.

Approximately 150–200 new car parking spaces would be needed. This will depend on the final provisions, how close the facility is to both public and active transport means, and the consenting requirements. Further overflow parking may also be provided subject to location and availability.

Separate facilities

Because separate facilities cost more – both now and over time – the Council may not be able to provide as much to the community as what a co-located facility would offer.

Separate facilities would allow services to be shared across communities, however this may mean some careful decisions around what can and cannot be included. Furthermore as further site assessment studies may be required, the project may be prolonged.

Separate facilities could be made up as below:

Library and Customer Services

  • Library
  • Customer Services
  • Community meeting rooms (including space for Community Board meetings)
  • Staff areas.

Leisure Centre

  • Aquatic
  • Fitness.

Once the site(s) has been chosen and the configuration worked out, it’s essential that everyone has the chance to stay involved with the evolution of the design of these facilities. The Council is exploring a number of ways to keep the community involved.

Appendix