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Last reviewed: Wed, 25 Jul 2012

Christchurch City Council’s heritage assets



Christchurch City Council owns and looks after some of the city’s heritage buildings, sites, structures and objects on behalf of Christchurch’s citizens. The recent earthquakes has meant that some of these have been damaged, some so severely that sadly they cannot be saved.



This page provides updates and links on a few of Christchurch’s well-known Council owned heritage buildings, sites, structures and objects. For more information on the wider Council Facility Rebuild Plan and to view individual Detailed Engineering Evaluations please click here.

Addington Water Tower

A Detailed Engineering Evaluation  (DEE) Report concluded that the tower is not considered to be earthquake prone. As part of the DEE process further investigation of the tower’s structure will be undertaken in the near future. The purpose of this stage of the investigation is to confirm the strength/capacity of the building in terms of a percentage of New Building Standard (% NBS). Investigations of structural elements of the building will include:

  • concrete wall investigation: removal of a section of concrete to determine if steel reinforcing bars are present,
  • foundations investigation: removal and replacement of floorboards to gain access to foundations for inspection of  the condition and size.

A method for the protection of heritage has been developed. This work is expected to continue until late September. It is possible that this timeline may change if considerations emerge that were not anticipated.

Rose Historic Chapel

The Chapel performed similarly to other buildings of its construction and age in response to the earthquakes. According to engineers it seems likely that the strengthening in the roof could not resist the seismic loads created by the earthquake.

A recent qualitative Detailed Engineering Evaluation showed that the building is considered to be less than 33 per cent of the New Building Standard and is therefore defined as earthquake prone.

Work around strengthening options has started but more detailed engineering investigations will need to be carried out to provide more information towards a decision.

Sign of the Kiwi

Sign of the Kiwi

Update August 2012

As part of the Detailed Engineering Evaluation (DEE) process further investigation of the building’s structure will be undertaken. The purpose of this stage of the investigation is to provide more information for designs for strengthening the building. Final decisions about what will actually be done will be made by Councillors once they have all the relevant information. Investigations will include:

  • temporary removal of sheets of iron from the lower portion of the roof to inspect the rafter connections to the stone wall,
  • temporary removal of ceiling linings (where proposed strengthening might be installed) for investigation of the geometry of the roof structure,
  • temporary removal of sections of flooring to access the subfloor and to determine the depth of existing foundations and ground material.

A method for the protection of heritage has been developed. This work is expected to start early September and continue until mid to late October 2012. It is possible that this timeline may change if considerations emerge that were not anticipated.

Update June 2012

A qualitative Detailed Engineering Evaluation showed that this building is less than 33 per cent of the New Building Standard and is therefore defined as earthquake prone.

The damage from the building has included minor to moderate cracking to stone masonry walls through-out and several internal stones from above the eastern-most window have become loose or come out. These have been stored. As a result of damage to the chimney, it has been taken down to just above roof level, and heritage material securely stored. A quantitative investigation is now underway throughout the building which will provide information for possible strengthening options.

Sign of Takahe

A qualitative Detailed Engineering Evaluation showed that this building is less than 33 per cent of the New Building Standard and is therefore defined as earthquake prone.

The building has suffered moderate damage in the form of cracking to stone masonry walls and the loss of several parapet stones. More detailed engineering investigations will need to be carried out to progress a decision.

The damage from the earthquake includes: the collapse of the north-west chimney on to the roof causing damage to slate tiles and timber sarking; remaining chimneys have cracked mortar; stone blocks have fallen or were dislodged, cracks and movement to exterior stone mortar joints and at and the north-west gable. There are interior cracks and the dry stone wall on the west side has partially collapsed. The first drawings for possible strengthening solutions are being developed and a more detailed engineering investigation will be carried out.

Edmonds Clock Tower

Edmonds Clock Tower

As a result of the Canterbury earthquakes, the Edmonds Clock Tower has sustained cracking at two levels and the top section has moved. There is also moderate damage around the windows. In mid-May 2012 the tower will be carefully removed and placed on a bed of sand. A timber frame will stabilise the tower and then tarpaulins will keep the structure weatherproofed... more information.
Bridge of Remembrance

Bridge of Remembrance

Options for permanently repairing the bridge and arch are currently being investigated. We are aware that the site holds great significance for veterans, their families and the wider community... more information.

 

Statue of Captain Scott

Captain Robert Falcon Scott Statue

The grass beneath the Captain Scott statue, at Scott Reserve on Oxford Terrace at Worcester Street, proved to be a saving grace when this statue was thrown from its plinth in the 22 February 2011 Canterbury Earthquake... more information.

Godley House

Godley House, Diamond Harbour’s iconic heritage building and destination was badly damaged by the 4 September earthquake. It sustained further significant damage in the 22 February earthquake.

Two independent reports from structural engineers concluded that the building is unsalvageable and needs to be deconstructed and demolished.

Through careful deconstruction it is hoped that some heritage fabric will be salvaged.

Deconstruction work on Godley House

The deconstruction and demolition of Godley House began in mid-December 2011. Godley House has now been demolished.

Future plans for the site

Christchurch City Council will work closely with the local community and key stakeholders to look at all future options for the development of this historic site.

Download PDF [3.5MB] of a short history of Godley House.

Godley House Wake Photo Gallery

11 September 2011: The Diamond Harbour community and visitors from around the region turned out in big numbers to farewell Diamond Harbour's historic Godley House.

 

 

Authorising Unit: Communications

Last reviewed: Wednesday, 25 July 2012

Next review: Thursday, 25 July 2013

Keywords: heritage buildings heritage historic buildings his